After the Wave: Rebuilding Japan's Energy Policy

Nearly 2 years after a massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck the northeastern shores of Japan causing a catastrophic tsunami and nuclear meltdown the country is rebuilding and redesigning their homes and energy systems.

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by Megan Mazurek

TOKYO, Japan - Nearly 2 years after a massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck the northeastern shores of Japan causing a catastrophic tsunami and nuclear meltdown the country is rebuilding and redesigning their homes and energy systems.

Nuclear power has been a big portion of Japan’s energy policy due to its low carbon footprint and affordability, but after the Daiichi Nuclear plant meltdown the majority of people are looking to rely less on nuclear and more on natural gas and renewable energy.

Prime Minister Abe has not made it clear what the country’s energy policy will look like exactly, but energy officials are confident liquefied natural gas will play an important role for the next 50-100 years.

The program, ‘After the Wave: Rebuilding Japan’s Energy Policy,’ looks at several projects underway in the greater Tokyo area and the Fukushima prefecture, and the possibility of LNG exports with Alaska.

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