Ketchikan Schools Find Fault with State Ed Regs

The Ketchikan School District says it had to spend $7,000 to conduct background checks and fingerprint 31 preschool staff members to satisfy new state requirements, which they said was a redundant process.

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by Associated Press

KETCHIKAN- The Ketchikan School District says it had to spend $7,000 to conduct background checks and fingerprint 31 preschool staff members to satisfy new state requirements, which they said was a redundant process.

New state rules require both teachers and paraprofessionals in preschools to meet security regulations more stringent than what districts require of certified teachers.
Superintendent Robert Boyle said the new regulations are cumbersome.
A spokesman for the education department says background checks for preschool employees is extensive because young children are vulnerable. Under this system, employers are immediately notified if an employee has been reported of harming a child filed against them, or of having a conviction.
The department says it's up to the applicants to pay for the certification process.