Park Service: Moose Shooting in Park Justified

A National Park Service spokeswoman says her agency will not recommend prosecution of an Eagle River man who shot and mortally wounded an aggressive cow moose last week at Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska.

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by Associated Press

ANCHORAGE- A National Park Service spokeswoman says her agency will not recommend prosecution of an Eagle River man who shot and mortally wounded an aggressive cow moose last week at Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska.


Spokeswoman Kris Fister said Tuesday that visitor Robert Sirvid said he and four other people including two small children encountered the moose June 6 on a trail. He said they tried to hide behind a tree but the moose continued to charge and he shot the animal out of concern for the children's safety. Rangers had to destroy the moose.


Fister says an investigation found nothing to contradict Sirvid's statement that he shot the animal to defend the children's lives. She says while there is no "defense of life" provision in the federal laws governing national parks, under Alaska state law the incident would be deemed a justifiable defense of life.


The spokeswoman says wildlife biologists are actively looking for two apparently orphaned moose calves seen in the area since the shooting. If they are located, the park service will try to move them to a wildlife rehabilitation facility.