WWII Raid Survivors Set Ohio Ceremony

The last of the Doolittle Raiders from World War II will make their final toast together in a ceremony set for Nov. 9 at the national Air Force museum in Ohio.

Retired Master Sgt. Ed Horton honors the memory of retired Lt. Col. Horrace Crouch by turning his goblet upside down at the goblet ceremony during the 64th Doolittle Raider reunion in Dayton, Ohio, on Tuesday, April 18, 2006. The goblet ceremony is held to honor the Raiders who died since their last meeting. This year, they honored Colonel Crouch, who passed away Dec. 21 from pneumonia. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Cecilio M. Ricardo Jr.)

Tools

by Associated Press

CINCINNATI- The last of the Doolittle Raiders from World War II will make their final toast together in a ceremony set for Nov. 9 at the national Air Force museum in Ohio.
The Air Force says that at this time all four remaining survivors of the 1942 bombing attack on Japan plan to take part. All are in their 90s.
By tradition, the Raiders reunite each year and toast "those who have gone" from the original 80. They use special silver goblets with engraved names. For years, the plan was for the last two survivors to make the final toast.
However, after Maj. Thomas Griffin of Cincinnati died in February at age 96, it was decided to have a final ceremony this year because of the survivors' advancing ages.