Eagle River Girl Recounts Moose Stomping in Friend's Backyard

Calving season in May and June are hostile months for moose. Biologists say several mountain bikers have been kicked while riding in Kincaid Park and warn bikers to be aware of their surroundings.

Moose cow and 2 calves, standing in the boreal spruce forest, Wrangell - St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska.

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by Megan Mazurek

Two young girls and their families recover after they were injured by a moose at their home on the 18000 block of Sokoloff Circle in Eagle River.
Kelsey Laurin, 11, was playing in her friends backyard when she and Chloe Matzger, 6, were charged by a moose.
"We were getting a ball and I turned around because my friend was staring and she totally stopped moving," said Kelsey Laurin, one of the girls attacked by the moose. "So I turned around thinking that it was her brother was sneaking up on us because he was hanging out with us too and I just saw a moose and before you know I noticed it it just knocked me over."
The girls had jumped down from the trampoline to grab a ball, unaware that a moose was in the wood line about 10 feet from the yard.
Laurin ran to what used to be a house structure on a swing-set and began calling her friends father for help. Unfortunately, Matzger was unable to get out of the way and the moose began stopping, seriously injuring her. "She was sitting there because she couldn't get up and so it just ran back and forth over her, so I was just standing there because I didn't know what to do," Laurin said.
Laurin says Mr. Matzger began throwing rocks to get the moose to leave, and while doing so, the family dog ran outside startling the moose. The animal got caught in the swing-set which caused it to crash to the ground with Laurin inside.
"That's how i got this on my nose because one of the 2X4 pieces of wood hit me in the face," Laurin said.
Kelsey's mother taught her at a young age to respect animals and if ever charged by a moose, get behind a tree or structure which is exactly what she did. However, biologists say this time of year moose are more agressive than usual.
Biologists say the moose could have been spooked or was trying to protect it's calve.
"Right now everything with teeth is hunting these calves," said Dave Battle, a wildlife biologist for the Department ofFish and Game. "So the mothers get very protective."
Battle says he and others within the Department went to the location and found a cow, but no calve. They approached the moose, unsure if it was the same cow associated with incident, but it did not react aggressively to him or the group.
Residents say there were no calves seen in the area, but a pair had been spotted in the neighborhood in recent weeks.
"It's a very dangerous time to be around cows and calves," Battle said. "So we try to get everybody to pay extra close attention whenever they're out walking, hiking or even out around there houses because you know we've got calves being born in peoples back yards all around Anchorage."
Calving season in May and June are hostile months for moose. Biologists say several mountain bikers have been kicked while riding in Kincaid Park and warn bikers to be aware of their surroundings.
Laurin was treated and released from Providence Hospital Monday (5/28) night. Chloe remains in the hospital and is expected to make a full recovery.