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Haitian president's hometown holds funeral amid violence

Haitian president's hometown holds funeral amid violence

CAP-HAITIEN, Haiti — The body of slain Haitian President Jovenel Moïse was returned to his hometown Friday for a private funeral amid heavy security following violent protests and fears of political volatility in the Caribbean nation.Martine Moïse arrived to cries of “Justice! Justice!” as she headed straight to her husband’s casket, climbing the stairs and stopping in front of it. Her right arm in a sling, she lay her left arm on the casket and then brought it to her heart as she stood there in silence. Her eyes filled with tears as her three children joined her.Minutes later, a group of supporters grabbed a large portrait of Moïse and paraded with it as the police band began to play the national anthem over loud wails.As the ceremony began, hundreds of protesters clashed with police outside the private residence. Shots erupted and tear gas and black smoke wafted into the heavily guarded ceremony. Protesters’ cries carried over religious leaders speaking at the funeral.At the end of the funeral, Martine Moïse spoke publicly for the first time since the attack, her soft voice growing stronger through the 15-minute speech.“They’re watching us, waiting for us to be afraid,” she said. “We don’t want vengeance or violence. We’re not going to be scared.”Two U.S. officials confirmed there was an incident at the event and that the U.S. delegation left early. All members of the U.S. delegation were safe and accounted for and it does not appear they were targeted, according to the officials, who were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.Yves Paul Leandre, the Haiti Communications Ministry spokesman, said the U.S. and United Nations delegations left about 10 to 15 minutes after arriving due to hostile words being hurled by protesters outside at everyone arriving.Earlier, cries of “Assassin!” filled the air at the arrival of Haiti’s National Police Chief León Charles. Haitians clad in somber suits, shiny shoes and black and white formal dresses shouted and pointed fingers at the neighboring seating platforms where Haitian officials and foreign dignitaries sat above at least a dozen men with high-powered weapons.“You didn’t take any measures to save Jovenel! You contributed to his killing!” one woman yelled.On the grounds below, one Moïse supporter threatened Charles: “You need to leave now or we’re going to get you after the funeral!”Newly appointed Prime Minister Ariel Henry arrived after to cries of, “Justice for Jovenel!”White T-shirts and caps emblazoned with his picture were distributed to supporters the day before what is expected to be the final ceremony to honor Moïse, who was shot several times on July 7 during an attack at his private home that seriously injured his wife, Martine.“This is something that will be engraved in our memory,” said Pedro Guilloume, a Cap-Haitien resident who hoped to attend the funeral. “Let all Haitians channel solidarity.”Moïse’s body arrived shortly after dawn at his family’s seaside property where the funeral is being held. Six officials carried the brown casket up a stage where they saluted it and stood before it in silence for several minutes before draping a large red and blue Haitian flag over it.Before the funeral began, a man wrapped himself in a large Haitian flag and approached the casket, crying out, “We need to fight and get justice for Jovenel!” Next to him, a man carrying a T-shirt commemorating Moïse joined in as he yelled, “Jovenel died big! He died for me and for the rest of the country…We’re not going to back down.”The funeral comes days after Henry, with support from key international diplomats, was installed in Haiti — a move that appeared aimed at averting a leadership struggle following Moïse’s assassination.Henry, who was designated prime minister by Moïse before he was slain but never sworn in replaced interim prime minister Claude Joseph, and has promised to form a provisional consensus government until elections are held.On Thursday, violent demonstrations hit neighborhoods in Cap-Haitien as groups of men fired shots into the air and blocked some roads with blazing tires. One heavily guarded police convoy carrying unknown officials drove through one flaming barricade, with a vehicle nearly flipping over.A priest who presided over a Mass on Thursday morning at Cap-Haitian’s cathedral to honor Moïse warned there was too much bloodshed in Haiti as he asked people to find peace, noting that the poorest communities are affected.On Thursday evening, Martine Moïse and her three children appeared at a small religious ceremony at a hotel in Cap-Haitien where Henry and other government officials offered their condolences.“They took his life, but they can’t take his memories,” said a priest who presided over the ceremony. “They can’t take his brain. They can’t take his ideas. We are Jovenel Moïse.”Moïse was sworn in as Haiti’s president in February 2017 and faced increasing criticism in recent years from those who accused him of becoming increasingly authoritarian. He had been ruling by decree for more than a year after the country failed to hold legislative elections.Authorities have said that at least 26 suspects have been arrested in the killing, including 18 former Colombian soldiers. Police are still looking for several more suspects they say were involved in the assassination plot, including a former rebel leader and an ex-senator.——AP writer Matthew Lee in Washington contributed to this report.

Violence flares in Haiti ahead of slain president's funeral

Violence flares in Haiti ahead of slain president's funeral

Hundreds of workers have fled businesses in northern Haiti after demonstrations near the hometown of slain President Jovenel Moïse grew violent ahead of his funeralBy DÁNICA COTO Associated PressJuly 22, 2021, 2:23 AM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleQUARTIER-MORIN, Haiti — Hundreds of workers fled businesses in northern Haiti on Wednesday after demonstrations near the hometown of assassinated President Jovenel Moïse grew violent ahead of his funeral.Associated Press journalists observed the body of one man who witnesses said was shot in the community of Quartier-Morin, which is near Trou-du-Nord, where Moïse was born. Roadblocks were set up between the two communities, temporarily barring cars from entering or leaving as two plumes of thick, black smoke rose nearby.Many workers walked hurriedly in a single file along the main road that connects Quartier-Morin with Cap-Haitien, the city where events to honor Moïse were scheduled to start Thursday ahead of Friday’s funeral.Fleeing people said they saw burning tires and men with weapons demanding justice for Moïse. One woman who was out of breath said the armed men told her, “Go! Go! Go!” as employees clad in uniforms of all colors obeyed and left the area. She declined to give her name, saying she feared for her life.Abnel Pierre, who works at the Caracol Industrial Park, said he was forced to walk 45 minutes home because the bus that transports employees was stuck behind blockades. He declined further comment as he walked swiftly toward his house as the sky began to darken.These were the first violent demonstrations since Moïse was shot to death at his private home. They came a day after Ariel Henry was sworn in as the country’s new prime minister, pledging to form a provisional consensus government and to restore order and security.In the capital of Port-au-Prince, Martine Moïse, widow of the slain president, made her first public appearance since her surprise return to Haiti on Saturday, although she did not speak. She had been recuperating at a hospital in Miami after she was wounded in the July 7 attack at the couple’s private home.She wore a black dress and black face mask and her right arm was in a black sling as she met with officials near the National Pantheon Museum, where ceremonies are being held to commemorate her husband. She was accompanied by her three children.The capital remained peaceful in contrast with the community in northern Haiti.Authorities have said at least 26 suspects have been detained as part of the investigation into the assassination, including 18 former Colombian soldiers and three Haitian police officers. At least seven high-ranking police officers have been placed in isolation, but not formally arrested, Police Chief Léon Charles has said.On Wednesday, Colombia’s government said it would have a consular mission in Haiti on July 25-27 to help the detained ex- soldiers and repatriate the bodies of the three others killed by Haitian authorities in the aftermath of the assassination.

Haiti awaits new chief as official mourning starts for Moïse

Haiti awaits new chief as official mourning starts for Moïse

Haitians are beginning a series of official ceremonies to honor President Jovenel Moïse nearly two weeks after he was assassinated at homeBy DÁNICA COTO Associated PressJuly 20, 2021, 4:01 AM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articlePORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — While they await a new leader, Haitians are beginning a series of official ceremonies Tuesday to honor President Jovenel Moïse nearly two weeks after he was assassinated at home.The body of Moïse was to lie in state starting before dawn at the National Pantheon Museum in the capital of Port-au-Prince, officials said. He was shot multiple times during a July 7 attack in which his wife was seriously wounded.The ceremonies come as designated Prime Minister Ariel Henry prepared to replace interim Prime Minister Claude Joseph, who assumed leadership of Haiti after the killing with the backing of police and the military.It was not immediately clear when Henry would be sworn in, but he promised in an audio recording that he would soon announce who would form a provisional consensus government to lead Haiti until elections are held.“We will need this unity to overcome the many challenges that beset us,” Henry said. “Some have observed the latest events with amazement, others wonder with reason about the management of the country.”Henry said he has met with various unidentified actors as well as civil society and the private sector. “I intend to continue and deepen these discussions, because it is the only way to bring the Haitian family together,” he said.Haiti elections minister Mathias Pierre told The Associated Press on Monday that Joseph would step down and cede the position to Henry, who was chosen for the post by Moïse shortly before he was killed but had not been sworn in.The change in leadership comes after a group of key international diplomats called on Henry to create a “consensual and inclusive government” in a statement issued Saturday that made no reference to Joseph. The Core Group is composed of ambassadors from Germany, Brazil, Canada, Spain, the U.S., France and the European Union as well as representatives from the United Nations and the Organization of American States.Robert Fatton, a Haitian politics expert at the University of Virginia, said Joseph’s departure was to be expected.“Joseph’s fate was sealed over the weekend,” he said. “Everything that happens in Haiti has a powerful foreign component.”On Monday, the U.N. said that Joseph and Henry had made significant progress in the past week to end the impasse and that it supports dialogue to find “minimal consensus” for holding fair legislative and presidential elections.Authorities have arrested more than 20 suspects for alleged direct links to the killing. The majority of them were former Colombian soldiers, many of whom officials say were duped.

New Haiti leader with international backing to take charge

New Haiti leader with international backing to take charge

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — A new prime minister supported by key international diplomats will take charge of Haiti, an official said Monday — a move that appeared aimed at averting a leadership struggle following the assassination of President Jovenal Moïse.Ariel Henry, who was designated prime minister by Moïse before he was slain but never sworn in, will replace the country’s interim prime minister, Haiti Elections Minister Mathias Pierre told The Associated Press.It wasn’t immediately clear how quickly Claude Joseph, who has been leading Haiti with the backing of police and the military since the July 7 assassination of Moïse, would step down.“Negotiations are still in course,” Pierre said, adding that Joseph would go back to being minister of foreign affairs. There was no immediate comment from Joseph.In an audio recording, Henry referred to himself as prime minister and called for unity, saying he would soon announce the members of what he called a provisional consensus government to lead the country until elections are held.“I present my compliments to the Haitian people who have shown political maturity in the face of what can be considered a coup. … Our Haitian brothers gave peace a chance, while leaving the possibility that the truth could one day be restored,” Henry said.“Now it is up to all the national leaders to walk together in unity, towards the same goal, to show that they are responsible.”The political turnover followed a statement Saturday from a key group of international diplomats that appeared to snub Joseph as it called for the creation of “a consensual and inclusive government.”“To this end, it strongly encourages the designated Prime Minister Ariel Henry to continue the mission entrusted to him to form such a government,” the statement from the Core Group said.The Core Group is composed of ambassadors from Germany, Brazil, Canada, Spain, the U.S., France, the European Union and representatives from the United Nations and the Organization of American States.On Monday, the U.N. issued a statement calling on Joseph, Henry and other national stakeholders “to set aside differences and engage in constructive dialogue on ways to end the current impasse.”The U.N. added that Joseph and Henry made significant progress in the past week and that it supports dialogue to find “minimal consensus” for holding fair legislative and presidential elections.Monique Clesca, a Haitian writer, activist and former U.N. official, said she doesn’t anticipate any changes under Henry, whom she expects to carry on Moïse’s legacy. But she warned Henry might be viewed as tainted because of the international backing that preceded his taking power.“There is not only a perception, but the reality that he has been put there by the international community, and I think that’s his burden to carry,” she said.“What we’re calling for is for Haitians to really say this is unacceptable. We do not want the international community stating who ought to be in power and what ought to be done. It is up to us.”White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Monday that the Biden administration “welcomes reports that Haitian political actors are working together to determine a path forward in the country.”“We have been encouraging, for several days now, Haitian political actors to work together and find a political way forward,” she said.Earlier, U.S. State Department spokesman Ned Price had said the U.S. would continue to work with Joseph after noting he was the incumbent in the position and was serving as acting prime minister before the assassination.On Monday, Price urged all political actors in Haiti as well as the civil society and private sector to work together in the interest of the people, adding that the U.S. is standing with them.“We have always said, and we continue to believe, that the decision of who should lead Haiti belongs to the Haitian people,” he said. “Political gridlock has taken a tremendous toll on the nation of Haiti, and it’s vital for the country’s leaders to finally come together to chart a united, inclusive path forward.”The Core Group statement was issued hours after Moïse’s wife, Martine, arrived in Haiti on Saturday aboard a private jet clad in black and wearing a bulletproof vest after being released from a hospital in Miami. She has not issued a statement or spoken publicly since her return to Haiti as the government prepares for the July 23 funeral that will be held in the northern city of Cap-Haitien. Other events to honor Moïse are planned this week in the capital of Port-au-Prince ahead of the funeral.Moïse designated Henry as prime minister shortly before he was killed, but he had not been sworn in. The neurosurgeon was previously minister of social affairs and interior minister. He has belonged to several political parties including Inite, which was founded by former President René Préval.The upcoming change in leadership comes as authorities continue to investigate the July 7 attack at Moïse’s private home with high-powered rifles that seriously wounded his wife.Authorities say more than 20 suspects directly involved in the killing have been arrested. The majority of them are former Colombian soldiers, most of whom Colombian officials say were duped. Another three suspects were killed, with police still seeking additional ones, including an ex-Haitian rebel leader and a former Haitian senator.———Associated Press writers Matthew Lee and Alexandra Jaffe in Washington contributed.

Haiti faces uncertain future as mourning first lady returns

Haiti faces uncertain future as mourning first lady returns

Haiti’s political future is growing murkier after the surprise return of first lady Martine Moïse, who was released from a hospital in Miami where she was treated for injuries following an attack in which the president was assassinatedBy DÁNICA COTO Associated PressJuly 18, 2021, 4:00 AM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articlePORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Haiti’s political future on Sunday grew murkier after the surprise return of first lady Martine Moïse, who was released from a hospital in Miami where she was treated for injuries following an attack in which the president was assassinated.Martine Moïse did not make any public statements after she descended a private jet wearing a black dress, a black bulletproof vest, a black face mask and her right arm in a black sling as she mourned for President Jovenel Moïse, who was killed July 7 at their private home.Some experts — like many in this country of more than 11 million people — were surprised at how quickly she reappeared in Haiti and questioned whether she plans to become involved in the country’s politics.“The fact that she returned could suggest she intends to play some role,” said Laurent Dubois, a Haiti expert and Duke University professor. “She may intervene in one way or another.”Martine Moïse arrived just hours after a prominent group of international diplomats issued a statement that appeared to shun interim Prime Minister Claude Joseph, the man currently running the country with the backing of police and the military.Joseph’s name was never mentioned in the statement made by the Core Group, composed of ambassadors from Germany, Brazil, Canada, Spain, the U.S., France, the European Union and representatives from the United Nations and the Organization of American States.The group called for the creation of “a consensual and inclusive government,” adding, “To this end, it strongly encourages the designated Prime Minister Ariel Henry to continue the mission entrusted to him to form such a government.”Henry was designated prime minister a day before Jovenel Moïse was killed. He did not respond to requests for comment.The U.N., OAS and U.S. State Department did not offer further explanation when contacted.Given the current state of Haitian politics, Dubois said he believes the arrival of Martine Moïse could have an impact.“She’s obviously in a position to play a role … given how wide open things are,” he said, adding that the Core Group’s statement is striking because it makes no reference to Joseph. “One has to wonder whether the developments in the investigation have anything to do with this. They’re all these puzzle pieces that are just changing moment to moment. Right now it seems very hard to figure out how to put these together.”Authorities in Haiti and Colombia say at least 18 suspects directly linked to the killing have been arrested, the majority of them former Colombian soldiers. At least three suspects were killed and police say they are looking for numerous others. Colombian officials have said that the majority of former soldiers were duped and did not know of the assassination plot.A day after the killing, U.S. State Department spokesman Ned Price had said Joseph was the incumbent in the position and was serving as acting prime minister before the assassination: “We continue to work with Claude Joseph as such,” he said.On July 11, a delegation of representatives from various U.S. agencies traveled to Haiti to review critical infrastructure, talk with Haitian National Police and meet with Joseph, Henry and Haitian Senate President Joseph Lambert in a joint meeting.The deepening political turmoil has prompted dozens of Haitians to visit the U.S. embassy in Port-au-Prince in recent days to seek a visa or political asylum.“We can’t stay anymore in the country,” said Jim Kenneth, a 19-year-old who would like to study medicine in the U.S. “We feel very insecure.”

Martine Moïse, wife of slain president, returns to Haiti

Martine Moïse, wife of slain president, returns to Haiti

An official says that Martine Moïse, the wife of Haiti’s assassinated president who was injured in the July 7 attack at their private home, has returned to the Caribbean nationBy DÁNICA COTO Associated PressJuly 17, 2021, 10:02 PM• 4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articlePORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Martine Moïse, the wife of Haiti’s assassinated president who was injured in the July 7 attack at their private home, returned to the Caribbean nation on Saturday following her release from a Miami hospital.Her arrival was unannounced and surprised many in the country of more than 11 million people still reeling from the assassination of Jovenel Moïse in a raid authorities say involved Haitians, Haitian-Americans and former Colombian soldiers.Martine Moïse disembarked the flight at the Port-au-Prince airport wearing a black dress, a black bulletproof jacket, a black face mask, and her right arm in a black sling as she slowly walked down the steps of what appeared to be a private plan one by one. She was greeted by Interim Prime Minister Claude Joseph and other officials.Earlier this week, she tweeted from the Miami hospital that she could not believe her husband, Jovenel Moïse, was gone “without saying a last word,” she wrote. “This pain will never pass.”On Friday, government officials had announced that Jovenel Moïse’s funeral would be held on July 23 in the northern Haitian city of Cap-Haitien and that his wife is expected to attend.She arrived hours after a key group of international diplomats on Saturday appeared to snub the man currently running Haiti by urging another politician, the designated prime minister, to form a government following Moïse’s killing.Joseph has been leading Haiti with the backing of police and the military despite the fact that Moïse had announced his replacement a day before the president was killed.Joseph and his allies argue that the designated successor, Ariel Henry, was never sworn in, though he pledged to work with him and with Joseph Lambert, the head of Haiti’s inactive Senate.The statement was issued by the Core Group, which is composed of ambassadors from Germany, Brazil, Canada, Spain, the U.S., France, the European Union and representatives from the United Nations and the Organization of American States.The group called for the creation of “a consensual and inclusive government.”“To this end, it strongly encourages the designated Prime Minister Ariel Henry to continue the mission entrusted to him to form such a government,” the group said.U.S. officials could not be immediately reached for comment. A U.N. spokesman declined comment except to say that the U.N. is part of the group that issued the statement. Meanwhile, an OAS spokesman only said the following: “For the moment, there is nothing further to say other than what the statement says.”Henry and spokespeople for Joseph did not immediately return messages for comment.The group also asked that “all political, economic and civil society actors in the country fully support authorities in their efforts to restore security.”Robert Fatton, a Haitian politics expert at the University of Virginia, said the statement is very confusing especially after the U.N. representative had said that Joseph was in charge.“More confusion in a very confusing and bewildering situation,” he said.The question of who should take over has been complicated by the fact Haiti’s parliament has not been functioning because a lack of elections meant most members’ terms had expired. And the head of the Supreme Court recently died of Covid-19.A day after the assassination, U.S. State Department spokesman Ned Price noted that Joseph was the incumbent in the position and was serving as acting prime minister before the assassination: “We continue to work with Claude Joseph as such,” he said.On July 11, a delegation of representatives from the U.S. Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, and National Security Council traveled to Haiti. They reviewed critical infrastructure, talked with Haitian National Police and met with Joseph, Henry and Lambert in a joint meeting.

Chaos reigned in wake of Haitian president's assassination

Chaos reigned in wake of Haitian president's assassination

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — The attackers raided the private compound of Haiti’s president before dawn, yelling “DEA operation!” and wielding high-caliber weapons. They tied up a maid and houseboy and ransacked Jovenel Moïse’s office and bedroom.When it was over, Moïse lay sprawled on his bedroom floor. He had been shot in the forehead, chest, hip and stomach, and his left eye was gouged.By the time the sun rose, the suspects had scattered by car and foot, leaving this country of more than 11 million in shock. People tuned into radio stations, some still in disbelief until gruesome photos began to circulate on social media.“I’m not saying he was a good person, but he didn’t deserve death,” said a woman named Sandra, who lived across the street from the president’s mansion. She and her son and husband squeezed into a shower in the back of their home when they heard gunshots echoing through the Pelerin neighborhood.Sandra, who declined to give her last name for fear of being killed, thought it was Haitian gang members who had been threatening to take over the area until she heard someone yell in English: “Go! Go! Go!”Interim Prime Minister Claude Joseph said the July 7 attack was carried out by a highly trained and heavily armed group. Details have been scarce, but Associated Press interviews with investigators and witnesses give a sense of the terror and chaos of that night.So far, police have detained more than 20 suspects they say were directly involved in the killing, including a contingent of former Colombian special forces soldiers. Other suspects were killed by authorities as they closed in.None of the president’s security guards were hurt. The president’s daughter hid in her brother’s bedroom and survived, Carl Henry Destin, a deputy peace justice, told the AP as he confirmed details of that night.Shortly after the slaying, several of the Colombians hid in a two-story business that once sold furniture on a narrow, hilly road just a few minutes’ drive from Moïse’s house.One of the Colombians texted his sister from the business around 6:30 a.m. “Things had gotten complicated,” Duberney Capador wrote to Yenny Capador.Half an hour later, her phone beeped with another message: “We are under attack.”She said Capador told her police were firing at them and that they were trying to talk to authorities and turn themselves in. Then he went silent for several hours and later turned up dead, his body badly bruised.At least three soldiers were killed in the shootout that blew out all the store’s windows.Among those killed was Mauricio Javier Romero. His wife, Giovanna Romero, told the AP that she last spoke to him at 9:30 p.m. on July 6, just hours before the attack on the president. She told him that she and their son were putting on their pajamas and getting ready for bed. He responded that they didn’t have power or internet and that they had turned on a generator. So he took advantage of the electricity and called her.“He then told me, ‘Say hi to the boy. I love you very much. A kiss. We’ll talk as soon as I can,'” she said. “That was it.”The suspects who survived the gunfire are believed to have fled through the back part of the building. They climbed more than 40 stairs, stepped through a small garbage dump and scaled a towering wall of concrete blocks. On the other side, just a short distance down a road in an high-end community, they found another potential hideout: the Taiwanese Embassy.Taiwanese diplomats were working from home at the time, and embassy security guards alerted Haitian police that a group of armed suspects were breaking through some doors and windows. Eleven suspects were arrested, officials said.The remaining suspects fled to nearby areas, some hiding in bushes and other places until a group of Haitians found them and roughed them up, in some cases slapping them. In one neighborhood, civilians bound the suspects’ arms with rope and forced them to walk while someone yelled “Move! Move!” until they reached a spot where police arrived and arrested them.In another nearby community, a crowd chased after two suspects and detained them. The AP observed police taking the pair away in the back of a pickup truck, and how some in the crowd followed to the police station and demanded that the attackers be given back to them.“They killed the president!” they chanted. “Give them to us. We’re going to burn them!”The crowd later set fire to a couple of cars riddled with bullet holes that they believed the suspects had abandoned at the business where the shootout occurred. The government decried their actions, saying they were destroying valuable evidence. The cars did not have license plates and inside one of them was some water and an empty box of bullets.Watching the scene unfold from above was Giovanni, who declined to give his full name out of fear for his life. He sleeps and works in an abandoned building where he makes furniture.At around 7 a.m., he said he saw a group of white foreigners wielding large weapons and stopping cars along the road that leads to the president’s house and the business where the shootout occurred. He said they were speaking Spanish, but he could not understand what they were saying.“They had control of the area,” he said, adding that some later fled in different directions in the hills above the store. He said he also saw Haitian police arrest the suspects after embassy officials gave them access to the yard.Joanne Massillon, a 45-year-old mother of three who lives nearby, said she heard police shouting: “There’s the white guy! The white guy! The white guy!” She said she didn’t dare venture out at that moment.“If you hear ‘Boom! Boom!’ you stay inside,” she said.Other men are also accused of helping plot the assassination, including a former rebel leader who rose to prominence following a 2004 coup and a Haitian man who is a physician and church pastor. Associates told the AP they believe he was duped.Haiti’s government is holding high-ranking officials in isolation, including the head of the president’s security detail. In addition, police have said that a Venezuelan businessman who owns a Florida-based security company that paid airfares for some of the Colombian soldiers is a person of interest because he flew to Haiti several times and signed a contract during a trip before the assassination.Colombian authorities have said that at least 26 former soldiers were involved. Other suspects include a former Haitian senator, a fired government official and an informant for the U.S. government.Back at the president’s home, debris including shattered glass, a broken side mirror and a barrier arm snapped in two cluttered one side of the entrance for about a week until it was removed. A wall near the entrance where an avocado tree grows is pockmarked with several bullet holes. Guards continue to stand near a massive bright blue iron gate topped with spikes and pocked with bullet holes circled in red as evidence.Moïse’s wife, who was critically wounded in the attack, is recovering at a Miami hospital.On Twitter, she said she still cannot believe that her husband was killed before her eyes “without saying a last word.”“This pain,” she wrote, “will never pass.”———Associated Press writers Evens Sanon in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and Astrid Suárez in Bucaramanga, Colombia, contributed to this report.

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