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Condo collapse first responders, victims' families visited by comfort dogs

Condo collapse first responders, victims' families visited by comfort dogs

Comfort dogs wearing blue vests that read “Please Pet Me” were brought in to help heal the families of victims at Champlain Towers South, as well as the first responders searching through the rubble.”We’re very concerned about their mental health,” Bonnie Fear, the Lutheran Church Charities K-9 Comfort Dog Ministry response coordinator, told NPR.Nine golden retrievers from Florida, Georgia, Illinois, South Carolina and Tennessee were deployed by the group to the oceanfront Florida condominium building, which collapsed on June 24. JAMES CARVILLE BLAMES ‘NOISY’ DEMOCRATS FOR NOT WINNING ELECTIONS: TOO INTERESTED IN PEOPLE’S ‘PRONOUNS’At least 97 people died in the collapse, and more are still missing. A cause has not yet been pinpointed, although there were several previous warnings of major structural damage at the 40-year-old building in Surfside.The comfort dogs provide a balm amid the grief. “They’re just either shocked or pleased that we show up in time of crisis just for the people that are hurting and affected by the crisis,” Fear told NPR.And the dogs are “just real sweet and pleasant when someone comes up to them,” she added.The collapse left Americans around the county grappling with concerns about older residential buildings.Since the collapse of the Champlain Towers South building in Surfside and the demolition of the rest of the structure earlier this month, efforts have shifted from rescue to recovery as crews sift through the rubble. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”Our prayer for [first responders] is that they make it through, they find what they need to mentally process and to know, in their minds, that they found someone’s loved one, they made a difference for the families,” Fear told NPR. “And I hope they hang on to that.”The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

South Korean gyms ban upbeat music due to COVID-19 restrictions

South Korean gyms ban upbeat music due to COVID-19 restrictions

For fitness freaks in South Korea, gyms will allow buoyant, jaunty K-pop superstar group BTS hit songs “Dynamite” and “Butter” but not top bubbly, bouncy jams on Billboard’s Top 100 like “good 4 u” by Olivia Rodrigo and “Bad Habits” by Ed Sheeran because of new COVID-19 rules, according to a report.Music that is higher than 120 beats per minute (bpm) during group workouts like aerobic or spin classes is no longer permitted in order to keep warriors in exercise rooms and health clubs from panting too fast or sweating on people around them.KIM JONG UN: K-POP IS A ‘VICIOUS CANCER’ THAT MERITS WORK CAMP, EXECUTIONA Seoul gym owner Kang Hyun-ku told Reuters his space plays fast-paced music.”Playing bright tracks is to cheer up our members and the overall mood, but my biggest question is whether playing classical music or BTS songs has proven to have any impact on spreading the virus,” Kang said. “Many people use their own earphones and wearable devices these days, and how do you control their playlists?”CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE
People exercise at a gym in Seoul on July 13, 2021, as South Korea announced implementation of level 4 social distancing measures amid concerns of a fourth wave of the coronavirus pandemic. 
(Photo by Jung Yeon-je / AFP) (Photo by JUNG YEON-JE/AFP via Getty Images))South Korea’s streak of more than 1,000 daily coronavirus cases has reached a week as health authorities scramble to slow a viral surge that has brought Seoul’s thriving nightlife to a standstill and professional baseball to a halt.Authorities said Tuesday that more than 800 of the 1,150 new cases are in the greater capital area, where officials have shut down nightclubs and prohibited private social gatherings of three or more people after 6 p.m. The Associated Press reports that only about 30% of South Koreans have received their first doses of vaccines.There are signs the virus is spreading beyond the Seoul metropolitan area as the country enters its summer holiday period. Busan, Daegu, Daejeon and South Chungcheong Province are among the major cities and regions that reported dozens of new infections.CORONAVIRUS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOWSouth Korea has added more than 13,000 cases this month alone, bringing its total for the pandemic to 170,296, including 2,046 deaths from COVID-19. The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Python escapes from aquarium in Mall of Louisiana

Python escapes from aquarium in Mall of Louisiana

The Blue Zoo Aquarium inside the Mall of Louisiana was closed Tuesday after a python used in shows to entertain children escaped from its enclosure, according to reports.The St. George Fire Department was sent in around 10:20 a.m. Tuesday to find Cara, who is about 12 feet long.Officials said the mall was closed at the outset but only the Blue Zoo was locked down as of around noon Tuesday.LARGEST TEACHERS UNION SAYS CRITICAL RACE THEORY IS ‘REASONABLE AND APPROPRIATE’ FOR KIDSBlue Zoo told WAFB in a statement Tuesday afternoon: “While we’ve created a very secure home for Cara, our Burmese Python, she has slithered out of her exhibit. Cara is a non-poisonous, friendly snake that enjoys her time interacting with guests during our Snake Education Shows. Cara is an adored member of our Blue Zoo family. The safety of our animals is of utmost importance to us, so to ensure Cara’s safety, we will be closed for the day. Please check back for updates and opening times.”The aquarium in Baton Rouge, which opened this year in the mall, believes Cara is still inside, possibly in the ceiling, and is unsure how she escaped, according to the report.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPBlue Zoo chief marketing officer Ronda Swanson told The Advocate Cara is a “very sweet snake.” “We want to protect the snake as best we can,” Swanson told the newspaper.

Open-air museum of rebuilt historic buildings in UK becomes TikTok hit during lockdown

Open-air museum of rebuilt historic buildings in UK becomes TikTok hit during lockdown

Fox News Presents: An Independence Day Special Co-hosted by FNC correspondent Aishah Hasnie, Johnny Joey Jones, Lisa Boothe and Raymond Arroyo, this Independence Day Special will feature the West Point Band’s 4th of July concert. Plus, live fireworks from our Nation’s capital and a special performance by John Rich.The Black Country Living Museum, an open-air exhibition hall of rebuilt historic building, in the United Kingdom, got hit hard by the pandemic.”We usually have 250,000 visitors a year,” Carol King, the museum’s director of programs, told The Guardian. “Last year it was 90,000 – and there was definitely a danger we could have closed for good.”The staff of the English landmark play canal painters, horse wranglers and fireside sages, among other characters that help teach children about history and tradition.To stay relevant, they got very creative.CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGEJohn Homer, as his character of a flat-capped 1920s grandfather giving fireside chats, became a TikTok star garnering more than 22 million global views.”Warro! Wait a minute. Doe scroll down!” Homer said in one clip on TikTok. “I’ve got summat important to tell yow. Now I know some days are ’ard and I know it doe always go your road, believe yow me. But it’s OK to be sad and it’s OK to cry. That’s what makes us all ’uman. Breathe, relax and tek it one day at a time. It’ll be OK in the end. And if it ay well it ay the end is it?” And with that he swiveled back to warm his hands at the parlor fire.Although the museum stayed closed in reality, in cyberspace it was the place to be: the arts center became the most followed museum in the world on TikTok.THE LOUVRE ACCUSED OF DAMAGING MASSIVE PAINTING BY AMERICAN ARTIST”I’d never heard of TikTok, so the whole thing has been incredible,” he told The Guardian. “But it’s been a great way of connecting with kids who might never have heard of the Black Country and the Industrial Revolution.”Ninder Johal, a second-generation British Asian, said the museum connects his family, from their past to their present, The Guardian reported. His father’s saga is part of its story.”He spent his working life in smoky and hot furnaces,” Johal told the newspaper. “For my children and grandchildren, visiting the BCLM and seeing such industries depicted will provide a legacy enabling them to understand who they are and the role their grandfather and great-grandfather played in the industrial landscape of the U.K.”CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPThe museum opened in 1978, and a future expansion is aimed at doubling visitor numbers to 500,000 a year, according to the report. “People are very proud to be from the Black Country,” King a local, told The Guardian. “They see this museum as part of the community. I’m not sure many national museums have that. Everything we’ve got is on display, most of it outdoors. Nothing is behind the scenes. We wear our hearts on our sleeves.”

‘Shampanskoye’ supply from France halted after Putin says champagne is Russian

‘Shampanskoye’ supply from France halted after Putin says champagne is Russian

Renowned winemaker Moet Hennessy said Monday that its champagne shipments to Russia were suspended after President Vladimir Putinsigned a law on Friday saying the term “champagne” is allowed to be used only for “Russian champagne.””These provisions lead to a temporary suspension of deliveries of products to assess the impact of this new law,” Moet-Hennessy spokeswoman Anne Catherine Grimal said, according to state news agency RIA-Novosti.Moet Hennessy is part of French luxury goods group LVMH and known for such brands as Moet & Chandon, Veuve Clicquot and Dom Perignon.
Renowned winemaker Moet Hennessy said Monday that its champagne shipments to Russia were suspended after President Vladimir Putin signed a law on Friday saying the term “champagne” is allowed to be used only for “Russian champagne.” (iStock)

Big Jake, world's tallest horse dies at age 20 in Wisconsin

Big Jake, world's tallest horse dies at age 20 in Wisconsin

The world’s tallest horse — 6-foot-10, weighing 2,500 pounds — has died.Wisconsin icon Big Jake lived on Smokey Hollow Farm in Poynette.WHO REPORTS CORONAVIRUS DISCOVERED AMONG MINK POPULATIONS IN 6 COUNTRIESValicia Gilbert, wife of the farm’s owner, Jerry Gilbert, said Big Jake died two weeks ago but declined to give the exact date of death when The Associated Press reached her Monday via Facebook.”We would rather not remember him by a date — it’s been a traumatic event for our family,” she said.Jerry Gilbert told WMTV that Big Jake was a “superstar” and a “truly magnificent animal.”
Jerry Gilbert brushes Big Jake at the Midwest Horse Fair in Madison, Wisc., in this Friday, April 11, 2014, file photo. 
(AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger, File)The Guinness Book of World Records certified 20-year-old Belgian named Big Jake as the world’s tallest living horse in 2010.His owner told the TV station that Big Jake was born in Nebraska and weighed 240 pounds at birth, about 100 pounds heavier at birth than a typical Belgian foal.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPHe said he plans to memorialize Big Jake by keeping his stall empty and inserting a brick on the outside of it with his picture and name.”It’s very quiet (at the farm),” Jerry Gilbert said. “The other horses know. I think they have their own grieving time because Jake was the center of attention around here. There is a huge void. It feels like he’s still here, but he’s not.”The Associated Press contributed to this report.

South Carolina BBQ restaurateur fixes up old cars to donate to families in need

South Carolina BBQ restaurateur fixes up old cars to donate to families in need

A South Carolina restaurateur moonlights as an auto mechanic for families in need.Eliot Middleton, 38, owner of Middleton & Maker Village BBQ, fixes up old cars headed for the junk pile and donates the used autos through his charity, Middleton’s Village To Village Foundation. His idea came to his head two years ago when families would walk miles to come to his food drive. TENNESSEE POLICE OFFICER HELPS TEENS GET THROUGH A ‘KNOTTY’ PROM SITUATION “And I just felt from that moment is what compelled me to pretty much do the car program,” he told FOX Television Stations Tuesday. His first client was a woman early last year, and since then he said he has fixed nearly $48,000 in repairs, from replacing tires to replacing engines.”I do what I can, and I give back what I can because the community supports me and my restaurant,” he added. His funding comes from donations or from his own pocket, and he has repaired and donated more than 30 cars.He has almost 40 people in his community on a waitlist for a refurbished vehicle, and he hopes donations never stop.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”It’ll be a much greater feeling if your car — that you’re about to salvage — can go to a family in need and help them along the way,” he said. 

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