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Falling for Pharma Bro: Christie Smythe's telling of her relationship with Martin Shkreli

Falling for Pharma Bro: Christie Smythe's telling of her relationship with Martin Shkreli

In 2015, Martin Shkreli made headlines for raising the price of Daraprim, a drug used to treat AIDS, by 5,000%. The media dubbed him “Pharma Bro,” and some called him the most hated man in America. But for Christy Smythe, this was just the beginning of a love story. Smythe was, at the time, a court reporter for Bloomberg News. She had covered Shkreli’s story, and when he was indicted for securities fraud, she was the first to break the story. In the Fox Nation special “Falling for Pharma Bro,” Smythe told Fox News’ Laura Ingle that, although Shkreli was pursued by many different reporters for an interview, he chose to call her. “He called me, and he was super nice,” Smythe said. Despite her initial interaction with Shkreli, Smythe said she had the same negative impression as the rest of the public. “My very first impression of him was the same as everyone else’s. This guy is full of crap, he’s lying, he’s trying to manipulate me,” she continued. But Ingle noted, “Christie says he quickly changed her mind.””From sitting down and talking to him more, there was this earnestness, this kind of child-like innocence almost. To me, it felt like someone who was fragile and hiding in this bravado,” Smythe noted. Smythe continued to cover the story of the Pharma Bro, their friendship growing.But in 2017, Shkreli was convicted of securities fraud with his bail revoked, and it was at that moment Smythe realized the depth of her feelings. “I was in denial about it for a long time,” she told Ingle. “Here I am this objective journalist, I can’t be having these feelings…but after he went to prison, it was a shock to my system.” “Love is love, what are you going to do?” she said. What Smythe did was uproot her life, eventually leaving her husband, and begin a romantic relationship with an incarcerated convict. Not long after this initial realization, Smythe visited Shkreli in prison. “I simply told him I loved him…he said that he loved me too…it was beautiful,” Smythe said. But the budding romance took a different turn when, in December 2020, Smythe published a piece in Elle Magazine about her relationship with the convict. The piece, titled “The Journalist and the Pharma Bro,” was met with immense backlash online, and Smythe said Shkreli didn’t want her to do it. His initial reaction was a public statement, released by Shkreli’s lawyer who said, simply, “Mr. Shkreli wishes Ms. Smythe the best of luck in her future endeavors.” Despite this initially cool response, Smythe said she talked to Shkreli on the phone several days later, with each being able to explain themselves. When it comes to the future, Smythe said she was committed to seeing the relationship through. “I’m committed to seeing this through,” she told Ingle. “To seeing what it looks like if we’re together on the outside.” “It’s a life-defining adventure, I think, no matter what happens in the future, I am absolutely glad I have done it.” “And, I love him, and I hope whatever happens in the future that this turns out not to be a tragic story, but something with, maybe not a happy ending, but at least a peaceful productive ending.” Whether that peaceful ending will come to fruition will have to wait until 2023. And until then, Smythe will be making the most of her life without Pharma Bro. For Christie Smythe’s full telling of her relationship with Pharma Bro, sign up on Fox Nation and watch “Falling for Pharma Bro.” Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from your favorite Fox News personalities.

Fox Nation supports America's veterans with 1776 challenge

Fox Nation supports America's veterans with 1776 challenge

With the Fourth of July quickly approaching, Fox Nation has teamed up with Team Red, White & Blue (Team RWB) to support America’s veterans with the 1776 challenge. Team RWB says the challenge “will showcase our commitment to the men and women who have served our country in support of our nation’s progress toward a more perfect union.” Over the 18 day challenge, participants will complete 1,776 reps of different exercises. On Day 2, Fox Nation’s Abby Hornacek demonstrates leg raises and seated leg raises. Exercises in the remaining challenge include push-ups, bicycle crunches, squats and planks.”We are so proud to support our veterans,” Hornacek said of Fox Nation’s sponsorship of the challenge. Fox Nation is also offering active-duty military and veterans a one-year free membership on the streaming service.Military members and veterans get one free year of Fox Nation if they sign up today.Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from your favorite Fox News personalities.

Arizona AG Brnovich on opting-out of Google tracking: 'It's almost impossible'

Arizona AG Brnovich on opting-out of Google tracking: 'It's almost impossible'

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich joined “Justice with Judge Jeanine” on Saturday night to discuss his state’s ongoing lawsuit against Google.The suit alleges that the tech giant has continued to collect location information even when users have turned tracking off. “It’s as simple as this: We allege that Google is violating our Consumer Protection Act,” Brnovich said. “What we have uncovered is Google systematically is collecting as much information about you and everyone else in this country without you having the ability to essentially opt out.” Recent revelations from the lawsuit showed that some of Google’s own employees had concerns about the company’s practices after a news report detailing the controversy was published. “Essentially, every time you use your phone, they are tracking everything you’re doing. They’re collecting every amount of information,” Brnovich said.GOOGLE EMPLOYEES SHARED CONCERNS OVER LOCATION TRACKING, ARIZONA LAWSUIT REVEALS”They essentially know more about where you’ve been than your spouse does, and more about where you’re going than a travel agency,” he added. Brnovich alleged that Google acts as an advertising company based on its revenue generation, and has “weaponized” its collection of information to manipulate search results. Host Jeanine Pirro noted that the federal government has to get a court order or warrant for the same location information that Google has. Brnovich agreed.”If I want to get a search warrant or track someone’s location … I would have to get a warrant and get a judge to approve that. Google doesn’t,” he said.Google’s argument, Brnovich noted, is that by accepting “terms and conditions,” users are agreeing to share their information. “How easy is it to opt out?” Pirro asked. “It’s almost impossible,” Brnovich responded. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”Even when people have opted out of location services, Google is still tracking. That’s what the internal documents show,” he added. “You may think you’re opting out, and you’re not.” In a statement to Fox News in response, a Google spokesperson said that the lawsuit mischaracterizes its services.”The Attorney General and our competitors driving this lawsuit have gone out of their way to mischaracterize our services. We have always built privacy features into our products and provided robust controls for location data. We look forward to setting the record straight,” said José Castañeda, a Google spokesperson