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LeVar Burton: 'Jeopardy!' host gig began 'scary,' ended fun

LeVar Burton: 'Jeopardy!' host gig began 'scary,' ended fun

LOS ANGELES — LeVar Burton’s quest to become the new host of “Jeopardy!” has been a confident, upbeat effort by the actor and those who rooted him on with a petition drive.But when the day came to tape the first of his week’s share of episodes as one of a succession of guest hosts, the show’s pace and the challenge of following in Alex Trebek’s much-admired footsteps threw Burton off stride.It made for a rough start to the five back-to-back tapings that begin airing Monday, said the veteran actor known for “Roots,” “Star Trek: The Next Generation” and ”Reading Rainbow.” He turned for advice to wife Stephanie Cozart Burton, who as his makeup artist was on hand to play coach during a production break.“Being at home, it feels like a really relaxed half-hour, but it’s not relaxed at all,” he said. “You can’t let your focus drop for a nanosecond.”Burton has been watching and assessing the other guest hosts — in other words, his competition for the position that the Canadian-born Trebek held from 1984 to shortly before his November 2020 death from cancer at age 80. Art Fleming was the quiz’s show’s original and only other host, in the 1960s and ’70s.Although Burton had made the show’s producers aware of his interest in being considered, his addition to the roster came after a petition backing him as the new “Jeopardy!” host caught fire (with more than 250,000 signatures to date).He faces other openly eager would-be hosts — including NFL quarterback Aaron Rodgers — but the actor, director and education and literacy advocate sees himself as a solid match for a game show that rewards knowledge.Burton spoke with The Associated Press about his wife’s on-point advice, why diversity matters for “Jeopardy!” and what he thinks of his chances for the job expected to be filled this summer, before next season’s taping begins. Remarks have been edited for clarity and length.AP: What was the guest-host experience like?BURTON: Scary. Really, really, really scary. Did I mention it was scary?AP: How so?BURTON: I’ve jumped out of airplanes. I’ve walked over hot coals. This was a real challenge. First of all, because (‘Jeopardy!’) is singular in the culture and what it means to people as a part of their daily lives. And the fact that there are only two hosts who have ever stood in that spot. The pressure, the natural tendency was to want to live up to Alex’s example, his legacy. I had, like all of the hosts, one day of rehearsal and the following day I shot five episodes of ‘Jeopardy!’ I came backstage after taping the first episode and I said to Stephanie, ‘Well, how did I do?’ She said, ‘ehhh.’ Now, this is a woman who loves me enough to tell me the truth. She said it wasn’t me.AP: How did you adjust?BURTON: I made it my business for the next four chances at bat to just be myself, to forget about the procedure, to forget about the process, stop trying, stop focusing on the wrong thing. You’re not going to be smooth as Alex, let go of that. But what you can bring to the table is you. So that became my point of focus. And when it did, I started having fun.AP: Why do you consider the show and the host’s role as worthwhile?BURTON: I’ve been about education my entire career, and I definitely believe in the medium (of television) as one where more than simply entertaining is the order of the day. I try and use the medium in a way that brings something else to the table as often as I can. I think that ‘Roots’ and ‘Star Trek’ and ‘Reading Rainbow,’ they all have that commonality about them, that common thread of entertainment, yes — and informational, inspiring, enlightening, educational, uplifting. We can do so much more than just sell each other stuff with the medium.AP: There’s significant diversity among the guest hosts. Would there be value in ‘Jeopardy!” having its first person of color or woman as host?BURTON: There’s nothing like ‘Jeopardy!’ in the cultural consciousness. It’s not that I’m trying to put it on the same level, but I liken it to Barack Obama being elected president in the United States in 2008. I personally never thought I would see that happen in my lifetime. Did his election mean that we were in a post-racial America? Obviously not at all. But it was an important step. Every time we reach that milestone of a first, it does say something about us. It also tells us something that we continue to have these moments of firsts…. that white is the normative default. The reason that white is the default is the conversation that we are trying to have in this country now, that there’s so much resistance to.AP: How optimistic are you about being picked as host?BURTON: I am a preternaturally optimistic person. Look, if I don’t get this job, will it be devastating to me? No. I mean, it will hurt, I’ll be disappointed. And I’ll be fine, because what I know about my life is that which is supposed to be for me comes my way. And that which is not mine, doesn’t. The most important thing is that I went for it and my passion was rewarded. I got what I wanted, which was an opportunity to compete for the job. If I don’t get the gig, it’s not immaterial, but it certainly is secondary. I got what I was after. The chance — get me in the room.

'Naomi Osaka' docuseries takes intimate look at tennis star

'Naomi Osaka' docuseries takes intimate look at tennis star

LOS ANGELES — Those looking for definitive answers about Naomi Osaka and how she copes with the demands of her career and fame shouldn’t expect to find them in a new Netflix docuseries about the four-time Grand Slam champion.It’s the tennis star’s unresolved questions that are the heart of “Naomi Osaka,” director-producer Garrett Bradley said of the series that was taped over a two-year period starting with the 2019 U.S. Open. Production concluded in early 2021 before Osaka’s withdrawal from the French Open.The three-part series debuting Friday is a contemplative, intimate look at a young athlete finding her way. Film of major tournaments, wins and losses, is interwoven with scenes of Osaka’s time with family and her boyfriend, the rapper Cordae; her training and business demands; Osaka’s reflections on her career, multiracial identity and the death of mentor Kobe Bryant, and her decision to protest police killings of Black men and women.“It was really important for me to not go into the project with an agenda or really even with an opinion,” Bradley, a 2021 Oscar nominee for the documentary “Time,” said. “I really tried to open myself up to her world and where she was at, and tried to understand the sort of essence of who she was.”As filming progressed, she said, it became clear that the series’ foundation would be the conundrums faced not only by Osaka but society at large.Those inquiries are “connected to value systems and self-definition, and how one can create a more holistic understanding of themselves in any given environment that they find themselves in,” said Bradley, whose fellow producers include LeBron James.Osaka, 23, who was not made available for an interview, withdrew from the French Open last May, citing “huge waves of anxiety” before speaking to the media and revealing that she has suffered long bouts of depression.She also skipped the just-ended Wimbledon, with her agent saying she wanted personal time, but is expected to compete in the upcoming Tokyo Olympics for her native Japan. Osaka was just a few years old when she, her sister and their Japanese mother and Haitian father moved to the United States.In a Time magazine essay published July 8, Osaka wrote that, “Believe it or not, I am naturally introverted and do not court the spotlight. I always try to push myself to speak up for what I believe to be right, but that often comes at a cost of great anxiety.”“I do hope that people can relate and understand it’s O.K. to not be O.K., and it’s O.K. to talk about it. There are people who can help, and there is usually light at the end of any tunnel,” she said, thanking Michelle Obama, Michael Phelps and other public figures for offering support.The Netflix docuseries includes footage of Osaka and her sister, Mari, on the court as youngsters, with the tennis star recalling spending at least eight hours a day at practice, adding, “I was just tired.”Mari Osaka, 25, also played professional tennis but said in a social media post in March that she was retiring from the sport because it was “a journey which I didn’t enjoy ultimately.”The docuseries sketches a portrait of Naomi Osaka as thoughtful and driven to succeed but struggling to cope with her sport’s demands and her future. At one moment of self-reflection she says, “So what am I, if not a good tennis player?”Filmmaker Bradley cautions that the series should not be seen as definitive, but rather a snapshot of a brief period in a life that continues to “evolve and grow.”“This moment that we captured was her in the process of a learning curve, which I think she directly articulates really beautifully, (that) there are elements of fame that are hard to be prepared for,” Bradley said. “The sustenance that she finds is in accepting where she is currently in this moment, and certainly in her family and in her loved ones, but also is in finding her own voice. And that includes choosing when to use it and when not to.”Asked how she perceived Osaka’s emotional well-being, Bradley said she considers her “an incredibly strong and really brilliant person.”“She’s in control of her own narrative, and I think that’s a beautiful thing,” she said.

'Naomi Osaka' docuseries takes intimate look at tennis star

'Naomi Osaka' docuseries takes intimate look at tennis star

LOS ANGELES — Those looking for definitive answers about Naomi Osaka and how she copes with the demands of her career and fame shouldn’t expect to find them in a new Netflix docuseries about the four-time Grand Slam champion.It’s the tennis star’s unresolved questions that are the heart of “Naomi Osaka,” director-producer Garrett Bradley said of the series that was taped over a two-year period starting with the 2019 U.S. Open. Production concluded in early 2021 before Osaka’s withdrawal from the French Open.The three-part series debuting Friday is a contemplative, intimate look at a young athlete finding her way. Film of major tournaments, wins and losses, is interwoven with scenes of Osaka’s time with family and her boyfriend, the rapper Cordae; her training and business demands; Osaka’s reflections on her career, multiracial identity and the death of mentor Kobe Bryant, and her decision to protest police killings of Black men and women.“It was really important for me to not go into the project with an agenda or really even with an opinion,” Bradley, a 2021 Oscar nominee for the documentary “Time,” said. “I really tried to open myself up to her world and where she was at, and tried to understand the sort of essence of who she was.”As filming progressed, she said, it became clear that the series’ foundation would be the conundrums faced not only by Osaka but society at large.Those inquiries are “connected to value systems and self-definition, and how one can create a more holistic understanding of themselves in any given environment that they find themselves in,” said Bradley, whose fellow producers include LeBron James.Osaka, 23, who was not made available for an interview, withdrew from the French Open last May, citing “huge waves of anxiety” before speaking to the media and revealing that she has suffered long bouts of depression.She also skipped the just-ended Wimbledon, with her agent saying she wanted personal time, but is expected to compete in the upcoming Tokyo Olympics for her native Japan. Osaka was just a few years old when she, her sister and their Japanese mother and Haitian father moved to the United States.In a Time magazine essay published July 8, Osaka wrote that, “Believe it or not, I am naturally introverted and do not court the spotlight. I always try to push myself to speak up for what I believe to be right, but that often comes at a cost of great anxiety.”“I do hope that people can relate and understand it’s O.K. to not be O.K., and it’s O.K. to talk about it. There are people who can help, and there is usually light at the end of any tunnel,” she said, thanking Michelle Obama, Michael Phelps and other public figures for offering support.The Netflix docuseries includes footage of Osaka and her sister, Mari, on the court as youngsters, with the tennis star recalling spending at least eight hours a day at practice, adding, “I was just tired.”Mari Osaka, 25, also played professional tennis but said in a social media post in March that she was retiring from the sport because it was “a journey which I didn’t enjoy ultimately.”The docuseries sketches a portrait of Naomi Osaka as thoughtful and driven to succeed but struggling to cope with her sport’s demands and her future. At one moment of self-reflection she says, “So what am I, if not a good tennis player?”Filmmaker Bradley cautions that the series should not be seen as definitive, but rather a snapshot of a brief period in a life that continues to “evolve and grow.”“This moment that we captured was her in the process of a learning curve, which I think she directly articulates really beautifully, (that) there are elements of fame that are hard to be prepared for,” Bradley said. “The sustenance that she finds is in accepting where she is currently in this moment, and certainly in her family and in her loved ones, but also is in finding her own voice. And that includes choosing when to use it and when not to.”Asked how she perceived Osaka’s emotional well-being, Bradley said she considers her “an incredibly strong and really brilliant person.”“She’s in control of her own narrative, and I think that’s a beautiful thing,” she said.

'The Crown,' 'Mandalorian' top Emmy nominations with 24 each

'The Crown,' 'Mandalorian' top Emmy nominations with 24 each

LOS ANGELES — “The Crown” tied with “The Mandalorian” for the most Emmy nominations Tuesday with 24 apiece, but the Marvel universe also got bragging rights with runner-up “WandaVision.”The bounty reinforced the rapid rise of streaming, with most of the top-nominated scripted shows on services that emerged in the past two years. In the top three categories — drama, comedy and limited series — broadcast networks scored only two nominations, for the NBC drama “This Is Us” and the ABC comedy “black-ish.”During an oppressive pandemic in which housebound Americans relied more than ever on television for distraction, TV academy voters recognized a varied mix of storytelling and a diverse group of actors and creators.One example: Mj Rodriguez of “Pose” is the first trans performer to be nominated in a lead acting category. The show also earned a best drama series nod.“The moment my name was announced, I just screamed and I broke,” Rodriguez said. “My mom grabbed me. She kind of flung me around. … I remember falling into my boyfriend’s arms and just crying tears of joy, tears of happiness. I felt so seen.”Of the 96 acting nods for drama, comedy and miniseries, nearly 44% — a total of 42 nominations — went to people of color. That included 34 nods for Black actors, one fewer than last year.Netflix’s “The Crown” received its fourth nomination for best series, and is likely the veteran streaming service’s best chance to win its first-ever top series trophy. The British royal drama moved closer to contemporary events with its version of the courtship and rocky marriage of Prince Charles and Diana Spencer, played by Josh O’Connor and Emma Corrin.O’Connor and Corrin received lead drama acting nods, as did the series’ Olivia Colman for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II, with a supporting bid to Gillian Anderson for her role as Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.Oprah Winfrey’s headline-making interview with Harry — Charles and the late Diana’s son — and his wife Meghan earned a nomination for best hosted nonfiction series or special.The showings by “The Mandalorian,” an extension of the “Star Wars” franchise, and the inventive “WandaVision” featuring the Marvel characters Wanda and Vision, put the series in the ranks of past sci-fi and fantasy Emmy favorites “Game of Thrones” and “Lost.”“The Boys,” Amazon’s comedy-tinged take on superheroes, earned a best drama nod.“I would never have thought in a million years that playing a witch in a Marvel show would lead to this. It’s like a dream,” said “WandaVision” co-star Kathryn Hahn. She received a supporting actress bid, but found the show’s total of 23 nominations especially sweet.“I’m so moved that the whole of it has been recognized,” Hahn said. “It was incredibly difficult. It was a hard, hard shoot. But … the experience of making this meant so much to me and it was so unexpectedly deep.”The nominations haul by Disney+, which launched in late 2019, was impressive, but the triumph of streaming was predictable, said Eric Deggans, TV critic for National Public Radio.”Disney+ came out of nowhere and got the third-most nominations of any platform at 71. … We’re at a point now where this is this is increasingly becoming a streamers’ game and the Emmy nominations reflect it,” Deggans said.HBO and newcomer streaming service HBO Max edged into the lead with 130 total nominations, with Netflix close on its heels with 129.The frontrunner on the comedy side is the good-hearted “Ted Lasso,” about a middling American football coach imported to England to handle a soccer team. The Apple TV+ series received 20 nominations, including for top comedy, star Jason Sudeikis and six cast members.“Hacks,” starring Jean Smart as a stand-up comedian who resists getting aged out of Las Vegas and life, was next with 15 nods, including a lead actor award for Smart and a supporting bid for Hannah Einbinder.Smart, who some have said is enjoying a career “Jeanaissance,” earned a second nomination for her supporting role in “Mare of Easttown.” The limited series received 16 nods, including star Kate Winslet.Among the others who doubled down on nominations: “Saturday Night Live” stars Kenan Thompson and Aidy Bryant, who received supporting acting bids for the variety show as well as lead comedy series acting nods for, respectively, “”Kenan” and “Shrill.”Other top nominees include previous best drama series winner “The Handmaid’s Tale,” with 21 nods, tied with “Saturday Night Live”; “The Queen’s Gambit,” 18; the period-drama romp “Bridgerton” and “Hamilton,” with 12 each.“Lovecraft Country,” a horror-infused drama set in 1950s segregated America, earned an impressive 18 nominations — but was canceled by HBO after one season.“The Flight Attendant” earned nine nominations, including a best comedy actress nod for Kaley Cuoco and a supporting actress bid for Rosie Perez — who becomes the third Latina nominated in the category, after Sofia Vergara for “Modern Family” and Liz Torres for “The John Larroquette Show.”There were surprises, as usual. Nicole Kidman failed to receive a nomination for limited series “The Undoing,” while co-star Hugh Grant was recognized. But the critically acclaimed miniseries “I May Destroy You” and its star and creator, Michaela Coel, grabbed nine Emmy nods after being snubbed by the Golden Globes.One blast from the past getting new respect: “Cobra Kai,” set 30 years after the events of the “Karate Kid” film, earned a best comedy nod and four nominations in all.The other nominees for best drama series are “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “Lovecraft Country.”Other comedy series nominees are “Emily in Paris”; “The Flight Attendant”; “The Kominsky Method” and “PEN15.”The nominees for best miniseries are: “The Queen’s Gambit”; “I May Destroy You”; “Mare of Easttown”; “The Underground Railroad”; “WandaVision.”Father-and-daughter actors Ron Cephas Jones (“This Is Us”) and Jasmine Cephas Jones (“Blindspotting”) and TV Academy head Frank Scherma announced the nominees. There were awkward moments when some nominees’ names were mispronounced, including a reference to Anya Taylor-Joy as “Anna.”The Sept. 19 ceremony, which last year was held virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic, will air live on CBS from a theater and include a limited in-person audience of nominees and guests. Cedric the Entertainer is the host.———This story has been corrected to show that two broadcast network series, “black-ish” and “This Is Us” received nominations in the top three categories, and that Rosie Perez is the third Latina nominated for comedy supporting actress.——AP Entertainment Writers Ryan Pearson, Alicia Rancilio and Jocelyn Noveck contributed to this report.

'The Queen's Gambit,' 'Ted Lasso' vie for Emmy nominations

'The Queen's Gambit,' 'Ted Lasso' vie for Emmy nominations

TV shows that helped distract America during the pandemic are in the hunt for Emmy nominationsBy LYNN ELBER AP Television WriterJuly 13, 2021, 6:29 AM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleLOS ANGELES — “The Crown” and “Ted Lasso,” among the TV shows that helped distract America during an oppressive pandemic year, are in the hunt for Emmy recognition.The nominations for the 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards will be announced Tuesday by father-and-daughter actors Ron Cephas Jones (“This Is Us”) and Jasmine Cephas Jones (“Blindspotting”), and TV academy chief executive Frank Scherma.In its fourth season, the British royal drama “The Crown” moved closer to contemporary events with its version of the courtship and rocky marriage of Prince Charles and Diana Spencer, played by Josh O’Connor and Emma Corrin.The actors are among the favorites for Emmy nods, along with Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth II and Gillian Anderson as Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.For Netflix, which led the way for the rise of streaming services but has yet to claim a top series trophy, “The Crown” may represent its best bet. It’s been nominated three times before.“Ted Lasso,” a feel-good comedy about a middling American football coach abruptly imported to England to take over a soccer team, could snare nominations for star Jason Sudeikis and cast members including Hannah Waddingham and Nick Mohammed.Contenders in the miniseries category include “The Queen’s Gambit,” with breakout star Anya Taylor-Joy as a troubled chess prodigy, and “The Underground Railroad,” based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Colson Whitehead and created by Oscar-winning director Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”).Thuso Mbedu and Aaron Pierre, who star in the wrenching depiction of U.S. slavery combined with elements of magical realism, are potential nominees.“Lovecraft Country,” which spins a tale about mid-20th-century racism with elements of horror, is up for drama series honors despite its cancellation by HBO after one season.“The Mandalorian” and “WandaVision” are among the sci-fi and fantasy genre shows in contention.Also vying for Emmy consideration are shows that made a splash and boast movie stars, including the crime miniseries “Mare of Easttown” with Kate Winslet and “The Undoing” with Nicole Kidman and Hugh Grant.TV academy voters have a chance to build on the inclusiveness of last year’s acting nominations, which included a record number of Black nominees — 35 — among the 102 contenders for lead, supporting and guest performances in drama, comedy and limited series or TV movie.At slightly more than 34% of nominees, that improved on the 2018 record of just under 28% of Black actors in those categories. Voters also have the chance to recognize other actors of color, including Rosie Perez for the comedy thriller “The Flight Attendant,” and trans actors Mj Rodriguez and Angelica Ross for “Pose.”The Sept. 10 ceremony, which last year was held virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic, will air live on CBS from a theater and include a limited in-person audience of nominees and guests. Cedric the Entertainer is the host.

Conan O'Brien ends TBS late-night show with snark, gratitude

Conan O'Brien ends TBS late-night show with snark, gratitude

LOS ANGELES — Conan O’Brien stayed true to form as he wrapped his TBS show “Conan” after nearly 11 years, bouncing between self-deprecating and smart-aleck humor before allowing himself a touch of sentiment.“Try to do what you love with people you love, and if you can manage that, it’s the definition of heaven on Earth,” he said, marking the end of his third late-night show over 28 years. It’s a tenure second only to Johnny Carson’s 30 years on “Tonight.”O’Brien’s next venture is a weekly variety series for HBO Max, set to arrive in 2022 with an as-yet unannounced format.The hour-long “Conan” finale Thursday was largely a trip down memory lane with clips of guests including Steve Martin, Tom Hanks and Sarah Silverman, and highlights of specials taped outside the United States. Will Ferrell appeared by Zoom from Boston, with Jack Black on hand to salute O’Brien.Ferrell noted that he’s been a guest for the conclusions of O’Brien’s previous shows, “Late Night With Conan O’Brien” and “Tonight,” both on NBC but with widely varying runs: the former from 1993 to 2009, the latter for less than eight months in 2009-10.“It’s kind of become a tradition,” O’Brien said of Ferrell’s presence.“It’s become (expletive) exhausting,” Ferrell replied. He then proceeded to perform farewells that he suggested O’Brien should bank for probable future need, including for his new HBO Max series.“People would say six episodes isn’t a lot, but you packed enough entertainment in them for eight episodes,” Ferrell said. He then lauded him for a string of projected talk show flops on Al Jazeera and Delta Airlines, and his YouTube “classic unboxing videos.”O’Brien, a writer for “The Simpsons” in his salad days, sat for his exit interview with surprise HR rep Homer Simpson, who was unimpressed when reminded that O’Brien was a talk show host.“Wow, a dying breed,” Simpson told the animated version of O’Brien. “There’s only like 800 of you left.”Black limped onto the stage wearing an orthopedic boot, which he and O’Brien explained was because of a badly sprained ankle Black suffered during pre-taping of what was supposed to be a big-finish action and dancing skit.In its place, Black serenaded O’Brien and his longtime sidekick Andy Richter with revamped lyrics set to the signature Frank Sinatra standard, “My Way.”“Conan, you are my friend. You are the best, and so is Andy,” Black sang, switching up the lyrics to honor “Con’s way.”The host, whose gravity-defying, trademark swoop of red hair has remained virtually unchanged through the years, wrapped up the show with heartfelt thanks to his colleagues, family and fans. He also shared a slice of philosophy.”I have devoted all of my adult life, all of it, to pursuing this strange, phantom intersection between smart and stupid,” things he said many people believe can’t coexist. But when the two come together, he said, there is a tiny flicker of “what is a kind of magic.”O’Brien, formerly a writer for “Saturday Night Live,” was championed by “SNL” creator Lorne Michaels to succeed David Letterman as “Late Night” host. Letterman moved to CBS in “The Late Show” after losing the post-Carson “Tonight” job to Jay Leno, a rivalry that became a media fixation.In an effort to design an orderly transition, NBC executives in 2004 anointed O’Brien to take over for Leno in 2009. After ratings for “Tonight” faltered with O’Brien, Leno ended up reclaiming the show and O’Brien found a new home and, he said, more creative freedom at TBS.

Olympic trials pique viewer interest in Tokyo Summer Games

Olympic trials pique viewer interest in Tokyo Summer Games

Amid all the back-and-forth about the feasibility of holding the Tokyo Olympics during the pandemic, there are early indications of viewer interest in the summer gamesBy LYNN ELBER AP Television WriterJune 23, 2021, 4:09 AM• 2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleLOS ANGELES — Amid all the back-and-forth about the feasibility of holding the Tokyo Olympics during the pandemic, there are early indications of viewer interest in the summer games.U.S. Olympic team trials in swimming and track and field that aired Sunday on NBC fell short of gold-medal ratings but won enough viewers to edge into the top 20, according to Nielsen figures released Tuesday.NBC’s coverage of the trials to date is down 26% compared to viewership for comparable Olympic trials in 2016 on the network. Basketball and hockey playoffs are one potential reason: It’s the first time the NBA and NHL events have overlapped with the trials.The NBA playoffs accounted for a lion’s share of the most popular shows last week and helped make TNT the most-watched outlet on cable or broadcast.The Olympics, delayed by a year because of COVID-19, will be held held July 23 to Aug. 8 despite widespread concerns from the Japanese public and medical community. The Olympics and the Paralympics combined will bring nearly 100,000 athletes and others into the country that has a low vaccination rate.NBC was the most-watched network last week in prime-time, with an average of 3.2 million viewers. CBS had 2.7 million viewers, ABC had 2.67 million, Fox had 1.45 million, Univision had 1.3 million, Ion Television had 1 million and Telemundo had 950,000.TNT handily led the cable networks with an average of 3.49 million viewers. Fox News Channel had 2.14 million, ESPN had 1.65 million, MSNBC had 1.19 million and HGTV had 1.15 million.ABC’s “World News Tonight” led the evening news ratings competition, averaging 7.7 million viewers last week. The “NBC Nightly News” had 6.3 million and the “CBS Evening News” had 4.7 million.

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