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San Francisco officer on rampant crimes: 'Chaos reigns supreme'

San Francisco officer on rampant crimes: 'Chaos reigns supreme'

Rampant crimes in San Francisco are “not new,” and “chaos reigns supreme” in the city, Police Lt. Tracy McCray told Fox News Wednesday. McCray made these comments after a Neiman Marcus in San Francisco was hit by shoplifters who fled with merchandise. Citing witnesses, the outlet said display cases were smashed and items were lifted from racks inside the store before the suspects escaped.”People are working at that store who depend on a paycheck, and if they close, there’s no guarantee that they’re going to find another job,” McCray, vice president of the San Francisco Police Officers Association, told “America’s Newsroom.” “This is much more than someone stealing a bag.”SAN FRANCISCO NEIMAN MARCUS HIT BY SHOPLIFTERS WHO FLED WITH MERCHANDISEIn addition, a former San Francisco police commissioner Joe Alioto Veronese made remarks about the crime surge plaguing the city. “We’re in a state of chaos and anarchy out here in San Francisco,” Veronese said. “You see it every day…you just come to expect it and hope that when it happens, you’re not in the line of fire.””America’s Newsroom” co-host Dana Perino asked McCray what the response was like when she gets a call about theft or burglary. “There are no consequences to hold people accountable because excuses are…[given] out by certain politicians,” she responded. “They say the most idiotic things to justify bad behavior, and so chaos runs supreme here.”SAN FRANCISCO OFFICER ON VIRAL VIDEO OF BRAZEN WALGREENS SHOPLIFTER: ‘CROOKS’ KNOW THERE ARE NO CONSEQUENCESMcCray compared these incidents to “scenes out of a movie,” and mentioned the crime spike in San Francisco is an “everyday occurrence.”Meanwhile, Target stores in the Golden City announced they have reduced their operating hours due to a significant and alarming rise in theft. The retail company put out the following statement on the crime surge in San Francisco:”For more than a month, we’ve been experiencing a significant, and alarming rise in theft and security incidents at our San Francisco stores, similar to reports from other retailers in the area. With the safety of our guests, team members, and communities as our top priority, we’ve temporarily reduced our operating hours in six San Francisco stores.”McCray said retail businesses reducing their hours due to crime has never happened before in San Francisco. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”Now you have people whose hours have been cut at these stores. They’re going to miss out on money in their check for their daily living activities, paying rent, buying food, clothing,” she concluded. “I’m not surprised by it and no one should be.”Fox News’ Edmund DeMarche contributed to this report.

‘Park’d’: Abby Hornacek reaches great heights at New River Gorge National Park

‘Park’d’: Abby Hornacek reaches great heights at New River Gorge National Park

Fox Nation host Abby Hornacek is reaching great heights on her newest episode of “Park’d.”In the episode, “New River Gorge,” Hornacek takes a deep dive into America’s 63rd National Park in West Virginia. “The views from the catwalk are spectacular,” Doug Coleman, the bridge walk guide, told Hornacek. “They began to piece the bridge together back in June of 1974 and three years and four months later, at a cost of 37 million dollars, the bridge was open to the public.”Hornacek explores the 70,000 acres of land along the New River and learns about Bridge Day, a celebration where people gather to commemorate the platform being built. “Bridge day is the one day out of the year that the bridge is closed to traffic and we celebrate the bridge,” Coleman told Hornacek. “Typically, 80 to 100,000 people show up, 400 people bring their parachutes to jump. You can rappel from the catwalk. It’s a big festival.”New River Gorge Bridge is 3,000 feet long, equating to nearly 6/10 of a mile, 250 feet high, and 69 feet wide. The structure is the longest single-span steel arch bridge in the Western Hemisphere.CLICK HERE TO JOIN FOX NATION”You get the new river, the gorge, all the trees,” Hornacek concluded. “Stunning.”For more adventures on “Park’d” Season 5, join Abby Hornacek as she continues to explore the rich history of America’s National Parks — from the mighty Grand Canyon or Guadalupe Peak in Guadalupe Mountains National Park to the tranquil beauty of Biscayne National Park in Florida.”Park’d with Abby Hornacek” is available to stream exclusively on Fox Nation.CLICK HERE TO GET FOX NATIONFox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from your favorite Fox News personalities.

Miami condo collapse survivor says it’s a ‘miracle’ he escaped

Miami condo collapse survivor says it’s a ‘miracle’ he escaped

A survivor of the Florida condominium collapse that occurred last Thursday is speaking out about his near-death experience.Steve Rosenthal was rescued from the Champlain Towers South condo shortly after the building disintegrated and said it was a “miracle” that he was able to escape.Rosenthal mentioned it was 1:30 am on Thursday and he heard a loud thunder sound. The Florida resident added he thought it was a dream and then felt the room starting to shake. “…dust starts falling from the ceiling, hitting my face,” Rosenthal told “The Faulkner Focus.” “I’m going, OK. It’s an earthquake, one in ten thousand year earthquake that’s hitting Florida.”LIVE UPDATES: FLORIDA RESCUERS FIND 11TH VICTIM IN CONDO COLLAPSEThe Surfside survivor continued to say he immediately jumped out of bed and ran to the balcony to check out the damages the “earthquake” has done to the city. “I run to the front door…I can’t see anything. All dust. Toxic dust just slams on me right into the bedroom, powers out…” he told host Harris Faulkner. Rosenthal said after he quickly packed a bag with clothes, he opened the hallway door again and witnessed the building collapsing. He recalled hearing his neighbors screaming for help, and later discovered they died in the tragic incident. “…there was just no way [out]. I couldn’t go down the fire escape or the steps…the hallway was impassable,” Rosenthal told Faulkner. “All you could do is go to the balcony and wait for your rescue.”MIAMI CONDO COLLAPSE: 2 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS AMONG 150 STILL MISSING, REPORT SAYSThe 20-year Champlain Towers resident added he was aware that the building required some work and needed to be upgraded, but had no idea the severity of the situation. Meanwhile, the Surfside survivor is the first individual to sue the Champlain Towers and mentioned he suffered from bruises on his arms while attempting to escape the crumbling building. At least 11 people have died and more than 150 are still unaccounted for after the building collapsed in Surfside. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP “Another person that I know happened to just get out a minute before that. There are a few people that survived just by chance and just by luck,” Rosenthal concluded. “If you were sleeping, if you weren’t up, you’re gone.”

Illinois officers push back after local residents claim thin blue line is ‘divisive’

Illinois officers push back after local residents claim thin blue line is ‘divisive’

Illinois police officers are defending the badge and their thin blue line patches after local residents claimed the symbol to be “divisive.” “It’s about honor. It’s about pride. It’s about kinship,” Mount Prospect, Illinois police officer Lisa Schaps, alongside fellow officer Chris Berg, told “Fox & Friends” Tuesday. “You know, I even said love. I’ve got children. I’ve got family…it’s all of those things and it’s just really important to us.”Schaps’ comments come as violent crimes continue to surge nationwide. Last week, the Illinois police officer joined her colleagues and spoke out about the thin blue line patches during a village board meeting. PORTLAND POLICE ASSOCIATION LEADER SAYS MORALE AMONG OFFICERS ‘AS BAD AS IT’S EVER BEEN’”I invite those people to come to a ride-along with us, spend some time with us, hear our point of view,” Berg told co-host Ainsley Earhardt. “[The thin blue line] is symbolic for officers that have given their all, their lives to serve in their community.”The number of police officers killed in the line of duty reportedly has increased over 40% throughout the first 6 months of 2021 compared to 2020, a Fox News poll finds. The Mount Prospect Police Department Chief John Koziol told “Fox & Friends First” earlier Tuesday that the thin blue line patch was adopted in 2017. Since then nearly a dozen people have come forward and claimed the symbol “offended” them and demanded the patches be removed. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”It was designed back when there was a large number of police officers being ambushed,” Koziol added. “Over time, it has come to symbolize a memorial to police officers killed in the line of duty, and that was the entire intent of it being on our shoulder…that’s why we’re refusing to remove it.”