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Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

PONTIAC, Mich. — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, a sheriff’s office said.James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday. The couple was found a short time later, and the pair were expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail.A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the parents earlier Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.“I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy,” she said. “The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed.”Authorities said Friday afternoon that they were looking for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn’t been able to reach them.Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren’t on the run and had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.”“They are returning to the area to be arraigned,” Smith had told The Associated Press.Then Friday night, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys’ arrest.McCabe said the business owner in Detroit spotted the Crumbley’s vehicle and called 911. A woman seen nearby ran away when the citizen called authorities, the undersheriff said.Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. … I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”———White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Mom of Illinois State student wants FBI to investigate death

Mom of Illinois State student wants FBI to investigate death

A civil rights attorney has joined Jelani Day’s mother to demand the FBI take charge of an investigation into why the Illinois State University graduate student disappeared in August and was later found dead in a riverByThe Associated PressDecember 4, 2021, 4:30 AM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleCHICAGO — A civil rights attorney joined Jelani Day’s mother Friday to demand the FBI take charge of an investigation into why the Illinois State University graduate student disappeared in August and was later found dead in a river.Ben Crump told a news conference at Rainbow PUSH headquarters in Chicago that the Justice Department must step in and investigate Day’s death as urgently as it has probed cases of suspected foul play involving white victims, such as Gabby Petito.Crump, who is Black, gained prominence by representing the family of George Floyd and others who were the victims of police brutality and vigilante violence.“We will make him a priority,” Crump said Friday. “…There is a killer out there on the loose of this young Black man and we need to find him.”A coroner determined in October that Day died from drowning, but said it was unclear how the 25-year-old had gone into the Illinois River, 60 miles (97 kilometers) north of Bloomington, where he was last seen.LaSalle County’s coroner said an autopsy on Day found no evidence of “manual strangulation, an assault or altercation, sharp, blunt or gunshot injury.”Authorities have said his death remains under investigation. But Day’s mother, Carmen Bolden Day, said law enforcement officials have all but told her they believe her son died by suicide, which she dismissed out of hand. She said her son was not depressed or overburdened, had no school-related financial troubles and was studying speech pathology at Illinois State with aspirations of becoming a doctor.“I’m not the first mother who has lost a child, but when you lose a child and don’t know why … you cannot stop insisting that the people who have made pledges to protect and serve find the answers for you,” Day said during the event, where she spoke with defiance and persistence, then wept in Crump’s arms.Jelani Day was last seen Aug. 24 in Bloomington, sister city to Normal, where Illinois State is located. Day’s family in Danville and a faculty member reported him missing after he failed to show up for class for several days.Day’s car was found in a wooded area of Peru two days later and his body was discovered in the Illinois River on Sept. 4 in the LaSalle-Peru area. There was no reason for Day to be in LaSalle County, his mother said, and because he suffered no injury before he drowned, she questions how he got into the river.The LaSalle County Sheriff’s Department announced last month that Day’s cellphone had been found and sent to the FBI for forensic testing.“We want to know what was on his cellphone, we want to know what was his last call, what was his last ping, where he was last seen,” Crump said.In addition to Floyd, Crump has represented the families of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Breonna Taylor, among others.

Michigan school shooting: Community gathers at vigil to remember victims of high school tragedy

Michigan school shooting: Community gathers at vigil to remember victims of high school tragedy

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Florida man arrested for 1983 cold case murder after new fingerprint tech links him to slaying, police say

Florida man arrested for 1983 cold case murder after new fingerprint tech links him to slaying, police say

A Florida man was arrested this week for the death of a woman who was found badly beaten and run over at a train station nearly four decades ago after new fingerprint technology linked him to the slaying, authorities said this week.Ralph Williams was taken into custody in Jacksonville on Monday after he was indicted for the 1983 killing of Carla Lowe. The slaying was investigated by the Delray Beach Police Department’s cold case unit, which was formed in January. LAS VEGAS POLICE SOLVE COLD CASE RAPE, MURDER OF 16-YEAR-OLD 
Carla Lowe, 21, was found beaten to death and ran over in November 1983 near a train station. Authorities in Delray Beach, Florida announced an arrest in her killing this week. 
(Delray Beach Police Department )”This is the exact reason why the cold-case position was initiated earlier this year,” Delray Beach Police Chief Javaro Sims said during a news conference Tuesday. “To help bring some level of closure to the families who have lost any hope of justice for their losses.”Lowe, 21, was waiting for an Amtrak train in November 1983 but never boarded. Her body was found beaten and ran over on a roadway, authorities said. She had no ties to Williams and a motive is still unclear, detectives said.  Investigators said new fingerprint technology from the United Kingdom led them to Williams when a fingerprint was obtained from a piece of evidence. They declined to elaborate further, citing an ongoing investigation.
Ralph Williams is arrested for the cold case murder of Carla Lowe. 
(Delray Beach Police Department )”We weren’t able to get this fingerprint in the old traditional way that crime scene would get fingerprints,” said Det. Todd Clancy, leader of the cold-case unit.Former Delray Beach detectives were also present to speak about the case.”This case was picked up a number of times while I was still working and the advances in DNA and fingerprint technology and all that were still developing, and we kept working at it,” said former Lt. Mark Woods, who returned in 2009. “I’m so glad that the Lowe family was able to get closure.”
 
(Deray Beach Police Department )CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPSome of Lowe’s relatives were present at the news conference but didn’t speak to reporters. “I just want the world to know Carla was a good person,” Lowe’s sister, Jackie Lowe-Repass’ said in a statement released through police. “She was a beautiful and giving person. She wasn’t just a piece of trash that someone threw away.” Williams is charged with first-degree murder and is being held without bond, according to Duval County jail records. 

Michigan school shooting: Family of victim Justin Shilling loss leaves 'gaping hole'

Michigan school shooting: Family of victim Justin Shilling loss leaves 'gaping hole'

Oxford shooting suspect’s parents could face charges Former federal prosecutor Brett Tolman raises concerns about charging 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley’s parents for the shooting that left four dead and seven wounded. He also weighs in as Jussie Smollett’s trial begins.The family of one of the victims killed by a school shooter in Oxford, Michigan released a statement Friday saying the tragedy left a “gaping hole” in their family.”Our hearts are broken and yet still go out to the other families suffering this very same loss at this very same moment and which is beyond imagination, nothing any family should have to endure,” the family of 17-year-old Justin Shilling, who was one of the four people killed in a school shooting at Oxford High School in Michigan this week, said in a statement. 
A sign in Centennial Park shows support for the students and staff killed and wounded in the November 30 shooting at Oxford High School on December 2, 2021 in Oxford, Michigan. 
(Scott Olson/Getty Images)MICHIGAN TO HONOR OXFORD HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING VICTIMS AT BIG TEN CHAMPIONSHIP”The loss of Justin leaves such a gaping hole in our family that we cannot conceive of life without him,” the family added. “His potential was boundless in life and yet in death he continues to give of himself as an organ donor. We feel the world can’t have too much of Justin.”Seventeen-year-olds Tate Myre and Madisyn Bladwin were also killed in the shooting along with 14-year-old Hanna St. Juliana.MICHIGAN SCHOOL SHOOTING: ETHAN CRUMBLEY’S MOTHER TEXTED HIM ‘DON’T DO IT,’ PROSECUTORS SAY
Ethan Crumbley, 15, allegedly shot and killed four students and injured seven others at Oxford High School. His mother allegedly texted him, “Ethan don’t do it” during the shooting, prosecutors said. 
(Oakland County Sheriff’s Office)Ethan Crumbley, the 15-year-old suspect accused of opening fire at the high school, pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to one count of terrorism causing death, four counts of first-degree murder, seven counts of assault with intent to murder, and 12 counts of possession of a firearm in the commission of a felony. The sophomore, who is being charged as an adult, allegedly fired more than 30 rounds in the hallways of Oxford High School on Tuesday shortly before 1:00 p.m., killing four students and wounding seven others, including a teacher. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP
James and Jennifer Crumbley (Oakland County Sheriff’s Office)
(Oakland County Sheriff’s Office)Additionally, authorities announced that Crumbley’s parents, James and Jennifer Crumbley, are each facing four counts of involuntary manslaughter.”While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on November 30 and it is my intention to hold them accountable as well,” Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald told reporters during a press conference. “It’s imperative we prevent this from happening again. No other parent or community should have to live through this nightmare.”  It was reported Friday that after the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office was notified by prosecutor Karen McDonald that she was going to issue charges against the parents on Friday, deputies moved “to arrest the parents,” but their attorney told authorities that they “are now unresponsive,” Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard told Fox News’ “The Story” on Friday.”Our detectives and fugitive apprehension team and the U.S. Marshal Service and the FBI — all of us are in concert looking for them,” Bouchard said after police issued a “BOLO alert” was shortly after 1 p.m. CT to try and determine the whereabouts of the parents. “I’m confident we’ll find these two.”Fox News’ Emma Colton and Louis Casiano contributed to this report

Texas police officer killed in shootout with suspect

Texas police officer killed in shootout with suspect

A Dallas-area police officer was killed and a suspect was injured Friday after exchanging gunfire, authorities said. The shooting occurred around 1:40 p.m. in Mesquite, Texas, amid reports of an unspecified disturbance outside an Albertson’s grocery store. A male suspect displayed a gun and a shootout with the officer, a 21-year veteran of the police force, followed, Mesquite Police Chief David Gill told reporters outside the Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas.SUPERINTENDENT SAYS ETHAN CRUMBLEY CALLED TO OFFICE BUT ‘NO DISCIPLINE WAS WARRANTED’  
Investigators gather at the area where a Mesquite, Texas police officer and a suspect were killed Friday after exchanging gunfire, authorities said. 
(KDFW)The unidentified officer was struck twice and the suspect was hit once. They were both taken to the hospital where they were listed in critical condition before the officer died. “This was a senseless act of violence that ripped a loving father and husband from his family,” a visibly emotional Gill said. “He was a good man, a good friend and a good officer.”The identities of the officer and suspect have not been released. Dallas police Chief Edgardo Garcia offered his condolences via Twitter. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”Praying and mourning alongside our brothers and sisters from @MesquitePD_TX their fallen hero and his family. The @DallasPD also wears your patch today, and for as long as you need our assistance,” he wrote. A procession was held to escort the officer’s body from the hospital to the medical examiner’s office, Fox affiliate KDFW-TV reported. The officer’s death came amid newly released figures by the National Fraternal Order of Police that said 314 police officers have been shot in the line of duty in 2021, killing 58, as of Wednesday.”We are on pace this year to see the highest number of officers shot in the line of duty in one year ever recorded,” FOP president Patrick Yoes said in a statement released this week. 

EXPLAINER: How unusual to charge parents in school shooting?

EXPLAINER: How unusual to charge parents in school shooting?

Guns used in U.S. school shootings have often come from the homes of young perpetrators, but parents are rarely charged for the violence that occurs, experts say.That’s what makes the case against Ethan Crumbley’s parents uncommon, following the fatal shooting of four students at Oxford High School in southeastern Michigan. Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said Jennifer and James Crumbley ignored opportunities to intervene, just a few hours before the bloodshed.They’re charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter, while Ethan, 15, is charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.The Crumbley parents and their lawyers haven’t commented on the shooting or the charges.Here’s a look at the issues facing the parents:WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE GUN?The semi-automatic handgun used in the shooting Tuesday was purchased legally by James Crumbley on Nov. 26 while his son stood by at the shop, according to investigators.Over the Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley referred to it on social media as a “Christmas present” for her son, and Ethan posted a picture of it on social media, calling it his “new beauty,” McDonald said.With some very limited exceptions, minors in Michigan aren’t allowed to possess guns. But there is no Michigan law that requires owners to keep guns locked away from kids.“So many states do. There’s 23 states plus Washington, D.C., that have some form of a secure storage law,” Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said.WILL INVOLUNTARY MANSLAUGHTER BE TOUGH TO PROVE?“It’s an unusual charge to bring,” said Eve Brensike Primus, who teaches criminal procedure at University of Michigan law school.Police said Ethan Crumbley emerged from a bathroom and started shooting other students in the hallway at Oxford High. A few hours earlier, he and his parents had met with school officials. A teacher had found a drawing on his desk with a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” according to the prosecutor.Ethan, who had no disciplinary record, was told to get counseling but was allowed to stay in school. His backpack was not checked for a weapon, McDonald said.Primus said authorities must show gross negligence by the parents and causation, or the act of causing something.“The prosecutor is going to need facts to support the argument that these parents really knew there was a risk that their son would take a gun and shoot people dead,” she said. “Not just that their son was troubled in some way. This is a homicide charge that carries years in prison. This is not a small charge.”In 2000, a Flint-area man pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter after a 6-year-old boy who was living with him found a gun in a shoebox and killed a classmate.WHY AREN’T PARENTS CHARGED MORE OFTEN?A 2019 assessment by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security found that guns came from the home of a parent or close relative in 76% of school attacks where firearms were used. In about half, the firearms were easily accessible.But laws aimed at restricting gun access are not always enforced and vary in strength, experts say.“Our laws haven’t really adapted to the reality of school shootings, and the closest we have are these child access prevention laws,” said Kris Brown, president of the Brady gun control advocacy groupIn 2020, the mother of an Indiana teen was placed on probation for failing to remove guns from her home after her mentally ill son threatened to kill students. He fired shots inside his school in 2018. No one was injured but the boy killed himself.In Washington state, the father of a boy who killed four students at a high school in 2014 was convicted of illegally possessing firearms. He was not charged for the shooting, although one of his guns was used.———AP reporter Sophia Tareen in Chicago contributed to this story.