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Liz Cheney: I was wrong to oppose gay marriage in the past

Liz Cheney: I was wrong to oppose gay marriage in the past

WASHINGTON — Rep. Liz Cheney says she was wrong to oppose gay marriage in the past, a stand that once split her family.Cheney, R-Wyo., a fierce critic of fellow Republican Donald Trump, also tells CBS News’ “60 Minutes” that she views her reelection campaign as the most important House race in the nation as forces aligned with the former president try to unseat her. She voted to impeach Trump over his role in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.FORMER PRESIDENT BUSH TO FUNDRAISEIn the interview aired Sunday night, Cheney said she had little affection for President Joe Biden, who she believes has embraced harmful polices for the economy and national security with the Afghanistan withdrawal. “But the alternative cannot be a man who doesn’t believe in the rule of law, and who violated his oath of office,” Cheney said.The daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney was an ascendant Republican leader before the Jan. 6 riot, yet she is increasingly defined by her public opposition to Trump and his hold on the GOP. Cheney, 55, noted that she still talks with her father every night and that they share the same views on rejecting Trump.CHENEY ‘BETRAYED’ WYOMING, HER TRUMP-BACKED OPPONENT SAYSLiz Cheney famously broke with her family in 2013 by opposing gay marriage ahead of a failed Senate bid. Her objections caused a rift with her sister, Mary, a married lesbian. Mary’s spouse, Heather Poe, posted on Facebook that year that Cheney’s position was offensive and that “I always thought freedom meant freedom for EVERYONE.”In the interview, Cheney said her opposition to gay marriage was misguided and she channeled her sister-in-law’s Facebook post in explaining why she changed her position.”I was wrong. I was wrong,” she said. “It’s a very personal issue — and very personal for my family. I believe that my dad was right. And my sister and I have had that conversation … Freedom means freedom for everybody.”While still opposed to gun control, abortion and the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare,” the Wyoming congresswoman finds herself on the outs for voting to impeach Trump after his Jan. 6 rally preceded a mob storming the Capitol in hopes of overturning his reelection loss to Biden. Trump continues to falsely claim election fraud in spite of results being certified by states and Republican election officials and courts rejecting dozens of legal challenges.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPAfter voting to impeach Trump, Cheney lost her leadership post as chair of the House Republican Conference. Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi put her on a nine-person committee to investigate the Jan. 6 assault and she serves as vice chair.Trump has vowed to defeat Cheney in next year’s primary election by backing Republican Harriet Hageman, an attorney. Cheney, seeking a fourth term, said nothing less than the authority of the Constitution is at stake.”I think it’s going to be the most important House race in the country in 2022. And — and it will be one where people do have the opportunity to say, ‘We want to stand for the Constitution,’” Cheney said. “A vote against me in this race, a vote for whomever Donald Trump has endorsed, is a vote for somebody who’s willing to perpetuate the big lie, somebody who’s willing to put allegiance to Trump above allegiance to the Constitution, absolutely.”The Wyoming congresswoman criticized House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy of California for sticking with Trump after the assault on the Capitol.”What he’s done is embrace Donald Trump,” she said. “And if I were doing what he’s doing, I would be deeply ashamed of myself. I don’t know how you explain that to your children. When you are in a situation where you have somebody who did what Donald Trump did, it is absolutely clear he cannot continue to be somebody you embrace.”

Trump wins Mackinac conference straw poll with 47.5% of vote

Trump wins Mackinac conference straw poll with 47.5% of vote

MACKINAC ISLAND, MI – Conservatives from across the state of Michigan flocked to Mackinac Island this weekend for the state’s biennial Republican Leadership Conference.Aside from taking in the stunning views of Lake Michigan and Lake Huron or enjoying a one-of-a-kind trip back in time at the island’s “Grand Hotel,” attendees also heard from big-name Republicans from across the country — including Texas Senator Ted Cruz, South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem and South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham.While the meeting is meant to serve as an opportunity for Michigan Republicans to exchange ideas and chart the party’s path forward, the event’s secret-ballot straw poll gives an unofficial indication as to who Michiganders would like to see atop the Republican ticket in 2024.To nobody’s surprise, former President Donald J. Trump took the top spot with 47.5%. That’s according to The Detroit News which sponsored the straw poll.While heads and shoulders above any other potential candidate, the mark is lower than the former President’s vote-share at CPAC in Dallas in July where he took home 70% of the vote. By comparison, the 45th President secured 55% of the vote at February’s CPAC in Orlando.About 740 people, all Republicans, were surveyed for this weekend’s poll, according to The Detroit News.The second-highest vote-getter was Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, with about 25% of the vote — consistent with his straw poll performances at both CPACs this year. Both CPACs, however, included polls with a potential list of candidates that did not include former President Trump’s name. DeSantis was the clear winner at both conferences in those polls.Rounding out the top five in Mackinac: South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem finished third with 8% of the vote, and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz had 6% as did former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley.In terms of the influence former President Trump holds over Michigan Republicans, 44% said a Trump endorsement would not impact whether they support a candidate or not.In terms of the issues Republican voters at the conference found to be most important, The Detroit News reports that 28% chose “election integrity,” which ended up topping the list. Taxes and spending followed close behind at 25%, abortion received 11% of the vote and inflation garnered 10%.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPIn terms of combatting COVID-19, 56% of respondents said government does not have a role in mitigating the pandemic.

WaPo columnist savaged for downplaying $3.5 trillion bill and saying it will be paid for

WaPo columnist savaged for downplaying $3.5 trillion bill and saying it will be paid for

A Washington Post columnist was savaged by Twitter after downplaying a $3.5 trillion bill Sunday on Brian Stelter’s “Reliable Sources” and claiming the bill would not cost because it was being “paid for.” The Democrats agreed Thursday to a framework determining how they will get the money for the bill, which contains billions in spending for child care, the environment, green energy and tax initiatives. The $3.5 trillion would be spent over the course of 10 years. Washington Post columnist Catherine Rampell, said her “number one priority” was to dispute what she claimed was a misleading narrative in the media that inflated the amount of spending in the bill.”There are good ways to spend a huge sum of money,” she said. “The kind of media coverage we have been getting doesn’t really explore whether the kinds of things that are in this bill are meritorious or not … Instead, it’s about the number.”REP. BRADY SLAMS DEMS FOR CREATING AN ‘ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL CRISIS’ WITH EXCESS SPENDING Stelter asked, “Why is that 3.5 trillion figure misleading?””Because it doesn’t really represent anything. It’s this weird shorthand that’s been used but, in fact, the bill will not cost $3.5 trillion in the sense that it will be entirely, or at least partly, paid for,” she responded. Rampell continued, “The actual cost in terms of deficits will be smaller than that. Perhaps, even zero – although I think that is unlikely. And it’s not even fully spending, it’s not right to call it a $3.5 spending bill, because there’s probably about a trillion in tax cuts in there, too. So it’s really hard to boil down the essence of what this legislation is because it does so many things and because they’re still negotiating over the basic parameters.”Stelter interjected, saying, “Yeah, and it will be over 10 years … and isn’t the broader point … they’re trying to do everything at once in one big bill?” “Well, it’s partly what you just mentioned, it’s partly that we don’t have majority rule in the Senate … [so the Democrats] have to cram everything into this one major piece of legislation … They have to do climate, they have to do paid leave, they have to do child care, they have to do green energy tax credits for cars and things like that. They have to put everything into this legislation because they can’t do piecemeal regular-order bills because the Senate doesn’t function like that way anymore,” Rampell said. Rampell’s response invited an avalanche of criticism and mockery. “Things don’t cost anything because someone else paid for them’ is logic my 9 year old uses about toys she sees on YouTube,” CEO of BurnRate Robert McLaws said. “My groceries were free, because I paid for them with cash, not debt,” The Federalist contributor Kyle Sammin mocked. “WH floated laughable ‘zero cost’ line & journos are just going with it,” Fox News contributor Guy Benson said. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said in a letter to House Democrats Saturday that she plans to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill and the reconciliation bill by Thursday. That simultaneously gives her some wiggle room on the vote for the infrastructure bill, which was originally planned for Monday but may slip a couple of days, and gives Democrats very little margin for error on the reconciliation bill. 

Rep. Brady slams Dems for creating an 'economic and political crisis' with excess spending

Rep. Brady slams Dems for creating an 'economic and political crisis' with excess spending

Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, argued on Fox News’ “Sunday Mornings Futures” that Democrats are creating an “economic and political crisis” as he discussed government spending. He argued that Democrats are trying to “ram through” trillions of dollars’ worth of “crippling tax hikes” and the “expansion of the welfare state,” noting that they have “also failed to keep the government open, failed to provide disaster relief to Louisiana and a lot of other states and of course haven’t raised the debt ceiling.”The ranking member of the House Ways and Means Committee told host Maria Baritromo that he believes Democrats are “more interested in playing political games with the debt ceiling” than “actually passing it and raising it.”The Senate is expected to vote as soon as Monday on a House-passed bill that will keep the government funded through early December and raise the $28 trillion debt ceiling. But the bill is almost certainly doomed in the upper chamber, where all but four Republican senators have promised to vote against it due to the inclusion of the debt limit. Democrats would need to secure the support of at least 10 GOP lawmakers to overcome a filibuster.It is unclear what comes next. Without a short-term spending bill, the government is set to shut down next week. At the same time, the federal government will run out of cash to pay its bills sometime in October unless the debt ceiling is raised or suspended, according to multiple warnings from Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Democrats have said a shutdown on their watch is not an option and have pledged to do whatever it takes to keep the government open. That could force the party to delink the debt ceiling from the short-term spending bill. Brady argued on Sunday that Democrats have “known this debt ceiling for two years was coming [and] they never passed a budget, haven’t had a single discussion with Republicans about how we tackle our financial future as a country, and they have the ability to pass this debt ceiling on their own.” “The question is: will they do that? My guess is, only if they’re forced to,” he continued. Brady also warned on Sunday that the reconciliation bill will impose devastating tax increases on low and middle income Americans.DEMS’ RECONCILIATION BILL HAS $6B TRANSPORTATION ‘SLUSH FUND’ THAT GOP AIDE WARNS COULD FUND BACKDOOR EARMARKSBrady made the comments on the same day House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said House Democrats will pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill this week and come to an agreement on their $3.5 trillion reconciliation package, despite the massive differences between moderates and progressives. The House speaker also said on ABC’s “This Week” that Democrats will “absolutely” need to come to an agreement on the reconciliation package before the infrastructure bill can pass. This was a nod to House progressives who say several dozen of their members will vote against the infrastructure bill without assurances on reconciliation. Pelosi said in a letter to House Democrats Saturday that she plans to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill and the reconciliation bill by Thursday. That simultaneously gives her some wiggle room on the vote for the infrastructure bill, which was originally planned for Monday but may slip a couple of days, and gives Democrats very little margin for error on the reconciliation bill. The House Budget Committee in a rare Saturday meeting approved the text for the reconciliation bill with one Democratic “no” vote, but with a wide gulf between party progressives and moderates the bill is subject to change significantly. Pelosi’s strategy of moving the reconciliation bill so quickly appears to be part of an effort to get progressives on board with the infrastructure bill, which they say they will not vote for unless they have assurances that the reconciliation bill will pass. It is unclear if the gambit will work, but moderates have expressed confidence that she will be able to whip together enough votes for the infrastructure bill to pass.On Sunday, Brady discussed the tax increases that are expected in the reconciliation bill and said that he has “never seen Washington spend so much to kill so many American jobs, to raise prices even higher and to expand the welfare state,” calling it “the greatest expansion in our lifetime.” “This is an economic surrender to China, Russia and Europe, with saddling American businesses with some of the highest tax rates in the world, which will drive and kill, we think, about 3 million jobs,” Brady continued, noting that many of those jobs will be driven overseas and would “make it easier to be a foreign company or worker than a U.S. company or worker.”He also warned that small businesses will be faced with “devastating tax increases” that are struggling “to get out of this pandemic economy and get Americans back to work.” Brady argued that “this breaks President Biden’s pledge to not raise taxes on the low and middle income families.” President Biden repeatedly pledged during the 2020 campaign not to raise taxes for Americans earning less than $400,000, but an analysis suggests that nearly 60% of taxpayers would pay more under his proposals. Findings from the Tax Policy Center, a nonpartisan think tank based in Washington, show that while most of Biden’s proposed tax increases would be paid by those earning more than $800,000 annually, a small burden would also be borne by some middle-income families. Three-quarters of households earning between $75,000 and $100,000 annually would face paying an additional $440 per year in taxes under Biden’s tax hikes, according to the data.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPFox News’ Tyler Olson, Chad Pergram, and FOX Business’ Megan Henney contributed to this report. 

Moderates and progressives soften negotiating stances as Pelosi predicts major progress on Dems' agenda

Moderates and progressives soften negotiating stances as Pelosi predicts major progress on Dems' agenda

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Sunday said House Democrats will pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill this week and come to an agreement on their $3.5 trillion reconciliation package, despite the massive differences between moderates and progressives. Her comments came as the leaders of the party’s warring moderate and progressive factions appeared to make minor concessions after a week of digging into their stances, possibly leaving some daylight for Pelosi, D-Calif., to pull off what is still a very difficult legislative lift”Let me just say we’re going to pass the bill this week,” Pelosi said of the infrastructure bill on ABC’s “This Week.” “But you know I’m never bringing a bill to the floor that doesn’t have the votes. And I think any time you put in an arbitrary date… you cannot choose the date, you have to go when you have the votes.”HOUSE DEMS PREPARE TO VOTE ON INFRASTRUCTURE, RECONCILIATION BILLSThe House speaker also said on “This Week” that Democrats will “absolutely” need to come to an agreement on the reconciliation package before the infrastructure bill can pass. This was a nod to House progressives who say several dozen of their members will vote against the infrastructure bill without assurances on reconciliation. DEMS’ RECONCILIATION BILL HAS $6B TRANSPORTATION ‘SLUSH FUND’ THAT GOP AIDE WARNS COULD FUND BACKDOOR EARMARKS”It’s all the wonderful legislative process that we have,” Pelosi said, dismissing comments from “This Week” anchor George Stephanopoulos about how daunting Democrats’ legislative task is. “Building Back Better has the support of over 95% of our caucus…. There are some who disagree and I respect that about the size of the package, and a couple in the Senate as well,” she continued. “And we have to find our common ground, respectful of each other’s views … this isn’t about moderates versus progressives.”The speaker may have gotten an opening on Sunday when the top moderate in the House and the chamber’s top progressive each bent slightly on their demands, leaving an apparent path for Pelosi to thread the needle on the two major bills. Previously, Progressive Caucus Chairwoman Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., was demanding the passage of the reconciliation bill before most of her caucus would consider infrastructure. Problem Solvers Caucus Chairman Rep. Josh Gottheimer, D-N.J., meanwhile, was insisting that Pelosi must bring the infrastructure bill to a floor vote Monday per a deal she made with him weeks ago. Jayapal, however, appeared to say on CNN’s “State of the Union” that a mere agreement on reconciliation would be enough for progressives to vote for the infrastructure bill. And Gottheimer conceded that Pelosi could move the infrastructure vote to later in the week. 
Holding up a copy of the U.S. Constitution, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., votes to impeach former President Donald Trump in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill December 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images)
(Photo by Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images)CONGRESSMAN WON’T SUPPORT DEBT CEILING HIKE, CITES NEED TO ANALYZE SPENDING”The way these things work if you start debating it and it rolls over to Tuesday, I don’t think – I think we’re all reasonable people,” Gottheimer said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” He also made sure to emphasize that infrastructure and reconciliation are “separate bills.” “Everything should be agreed upon… exactly what’s in there, the language needs to be worked out,” Jayapal said on CNN of what she would need on reconciliation in order to vote for infrastructure. “And everyone’s gonna vote for it, and if Republicans offer amendments in a vote-a-rama that we’re not gonna have Democratic senators suddenly vote with Republicans.”Jayapal added: “This is a pre-conferenced bill, which means everybody in the Senate and everybody in the House has to agree with every piece of it.”It will certainly not be easy for Democrats to come to that kind of agreement. There are many areas of disagreement on what should be in the reconciliation bill, ranging from the topline price to in-the-weeds policy issues. But the Sunday morning statements seem to put Democrats in a place where the demands coming from its various factions are not irreconcilable, which appeared to be the case last week. As part of the negotiating process, Pelosi said on ABC it is nearly certain the price tag of the reconciliation bill will drop to a lower number than $3.5 trillion. Jayapal, notably, appeared open to that in an interview later Sunday with CBS – though she seemed to say progressives would resist major cuts. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”Yeah, you know what we’ve said is we are happy to hear what it is that somebody wants to cut,” she said on CBS. “The key thing is not the topline number, it’s what is it that you actually want to fund.…Do you want to cut the child care, do you want to cut paid leave, what is it you want to cut?”Pelosi said in a letter to House Democrats Saturday that she plans to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill and the reconciliation bill by Thursday. That simultaneously gives her some wiggle room on the vote for the infrastructure bill, which was originally planned for Monday but may slip a couple of days, and gives Democrats very little margin for error on the reconciliation bill. The House Budget Committee in a rare Saturday meeting approved the text for the reconciliation bill with one Democratic “no” vote, but with a wide gulf between party progressives and moderates the bill is subject to change significantly. Fox News’ Chad Pergram contributed to this report. 

Trump turns up heat in attacks on top Georgia Republicans, touts pro-Trump candidates

Trump turns up heat in attacks on top Georgia Republicans, touts pro-Trump candidates

Former President Trump returned to Georgia this weekend, to amplify his attacks on the key battleground state’s top elected Republican leaders and to showcase a trio of candidates loyal to the former president.For Trump, the trip to Georgia was personal – it came as he’s still trying to overturn his razor thin defeat to now-President Biden in Georgia, more than 10 months after losing the White House in the 2020 election. And Trump used his rally at the Georgia National Fairgrounds in Perry, in the central part of the state, to target conservative Gov. Brian Kemp, Republican Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan, and GOP Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger for refusing the then-president’s calls to overturn the election results in Georgia.TRUMP MOVES POLITICAL HQ BACK TO MAR-A-LAGO Trump charged in comments to the large crowd that last year’s contest was “the most corrupt election in the history of the country,” as he once again repeated his unfounded claims that presidential election was “rigged” and “stolen” from him.And the former president urged his supporters to oust Kemp and Raffensperger in next year’s elections, saying “the people of Georgia must replace the RINOs and weak Republicans who made it all possible.” “RINO” stands for Republican in name only.
Former President Donald Trump greets supporters during his Save America rally in Perry, Ga., on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021. (AP Photo/Ben Gray)
(AP)Kemp, who along with Raffensperger is running for reelection next year, narrowly defeated Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams in 2018. But Trump said that he would have rather seen Abrams win. “Stacey, would you like to take his place?” the former president stated. “It’s OK with me.”While he’s yet to back a candidate to challenge Kemp in the 2022 Republican primary, Trump once again appeared to try and recruit former Sen. David Perdue to take on the governor.”Are you running for governor, David Perdue? Did I hear you’re running for governor?” the former president said.Trump’s endorsed Rep. Jody Hice in his primary challenge against Raffensperger. Hice scored a big hit with the crowd when he vowed to “get rid of Brad Raffensperger.”Another candidate the former president’s backed who spoke at the rally was state Sen. Burt Jones, a Trump loyalist who’s bidding for lieutenant governor to succeed Duncan, who decided against running for reelection.TRUMP, WITH SPATE OF ENDORSEMENTS, GOES WHERE NO FORMER PRESIDENT’S GONE BEFOREGeorgia is one of handful of states where Biden narrowly edged Trump to win the White House. The ballots in Georgia were counted three times – the original Election Day count, a mandatory hand recount and a recount requested by the president’s campaign. Dozens of legal challenges by Trump and his allies were shot down in Georgia and the other close states, and then-Attorney General William Barr said his Justice Department had not seen fraud on the kind of scale that could flip the election. The former president’s continuing his efforts to overturn the Georgia results. A week ago Trump sent a letter to Raffensperger, asking him to consider “decertifying” the election results due to alleged irregularities.Two months after Biden became the first Democrat to carry Georgia in a presidential contest in a quarter century, the Republicans lost their Senate majority after the Democrats swept – by razor thin margins – Georgia’s twin Jan. 6 Senate runoff elections. Republicans view Sen. Raphael Warnock, who was elected in the runoffs, as one of the most vulnerable Democrats running for reelection next year.
Former President Donald Trump listens as Georgia Senate candidate Herschel Walker speaks during his Save America rally in Perry, Ga., on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021. (AP Photo/Ben Gray)
(AP )Earlier this month Trump endorsed Herschel Walker, his longtime friend and former professional and college football star, who after the repeated urgings of the former president, launched a Senate campaign late last month. Walker, who gave his first campaign speech at Saturday evening’s rally, was feted with thunderous applause from crowd, many of whom were sporting “Run Herschel Run” stickers.FORMER PRESIDENT BUSH TO FUNDRAISER FOR CHENEY, SETTING UP CLASH WITH TRUMPTrump remains very popular with the Republican base and retains tremendous sway over GOP politicians. And Saturday’s rally was more evidence the former president remains committed to playing a kingmaker’s role in party politics, as he heavily weighs in on the 2022 GOP primaries.Trump’s 2024 caveatWhile Trump’s Georgia rally was all about re-litigating his 2020 election loss and putting his imprint on the 2022 midterms, he once again flirted with a potential 2024 run to try and return to the White HouseThe former president teased a “glorious victory in November of 2024. We’re going to have a big, big, beautiful victory.”But in an interview with David Brody of the Real America’s Voice network on the eve of the Georgia rally, the 75-year old Trump said that only “a bad call from a doctor” could prevent him from running again.TRUMP FLIRTING DOESN’T STOP OTHER POTENTIAL 2024 REPUBLICANS FROM VISITING EARLY VOTING STATES”I will say, that happens with people,” Trump noted, before adding that “you know, I feel so good.”Cruz, Noem, speak at influential Republican confabAn appearance this weekend by Sen. Ted Cruz in Michigan at the biennial Mackinac Republican Leadership Conference sparked more speculation that the runner up to Trump in the 2016 GOP presidential nomination race is ramping up for another White House run in 2024.The senator from Texas repeatedly targeted President Biden over the rocky U.S. withdrawal and evacuation from Afghanistan, as well as the immigration crisis along the U.S.-Mexico border. And he looked optimistically ahead to the 2022 midterms and the 2024 presidential election.”Politics has always had a pendulum aspect to it,” the conservative firebrand told the crowd at the storied GOP confab. “Throughout American history, when one party gets in power, they go too far in one direction and the American people have a great tendency to say, ‘Hold on.'”CRUZ IOWA SWING BUTS TEXAS SENATOR FIRMLY BACK IN 2024 SPOTLIGHTAnother Republican leader with potential national ambitions – South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem – also spoke at the conference.Who’s number two – Pence or DeSantis?Trump remains the overwhelming front runner in all of the extremely early polls in the 2024 Republican presidential nomination race. But two surveys released this past week had very different takes on who’s a distant second, and who’s the leader of the pack without the former president on the ballot.PENCE, IN IOWA, TAKES AIM AT BIDENFormer Vice President Mike Pence was runner up to Trump in a Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University/Harris Poll conducted Sept. 15-16. And Pence topped Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis for front runner status without Trump in the field. But the Florida governor topped the former vice president in a national survey of Republicans by the GOP polling firm Echelon Insights that was conducted Sept. 17-23.DeSantis, who faces a potentially challenging reelection next year, continues to spark more 2024 speculation with his political trips outside of the Sunshine State.  The Buffalo News this past week broke the story that DeSantis will team up with top New York State Republican officials on Tuesday at Sinatra’s Restaurant in Buffalo.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPThe Florida governor has been aggressive in courting donors across the country this year as he’s hauled in eyepopping figures for his 2022 reelection.Fox News’ Robert Sherman contributed to this report

Abbott vows to hire horseback border agents if Biden fires them, says president 'in dereliction of duty'

Abbott vows to hire horseback border agents if Biden fires them, says president 'in dereliction of duty'

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Sunday promised to hire the border agents on horseback accused of whipping Haitian migrants if they’re fired by President Biden – as he slammed the president and Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas for failing to secure the sovereignty of the United States. “Secretary Mayorkas and, if I can be candid, even President Biden, they are in dereliction of duty,” Abbott said on “Fox News Sunday.””The Biden administration has abandoned any pretense of securing the sovereignty of either Texas or the United States by having these open border policies,” the governor said. “The people in south Texas, they are angry about the Biden administration for ignoring, for abandoning them. The Biden administration cares far more for the people who are not in this country than he does for the people, American citizens who live in this country.”MAYORKAS SAYS AS MANY AS 12K OUT OF 17K HAITIAN MIGRANTS HAVE BEEN RELEASED INTO U.S., AND ‘IT COULD BE HIGHER’Abbott and his state have been on the front lines of the migrant crisis on the southern border, which returned to the headlines in recent days thousands of Haitian migrants crossed into Texas in recent weeks.One of the more controversial stories from the border last week was based on images that showed agents on horseback blocking Haitian migrants from entering the U.S. Initial claims that agents were using “whips” were debunked by officials and agents, who noted the agents were using long reins to control the horse, and were twirling their reins to move the horse forward.Even the photographer of the initial images said he did not see any whipping take place.Nevertheless, Biden vowed that the agents, who were removed from field duty pending an investigation, will “pay.” Abbott was incensed by the president’s treatment of the agents. “What the president said going after the border patrol who were risking their lives, working so hard to try to secure the border. If he takes any action against them whatsoever — I have worked side by side with those border patrol agents — I want them to know something,” Abbott said. “If they are at risk of losing their job at a president who is abandoning his duty to secure the border, you have a job in the state of Texas.”BORDER PATROL STUNNED AS BIDEN GOES TO WAR WITH OWN AGENTS OVER FALSE ‘WHIPPING’ ALLEGATIONS The governor added: “I will hire you to help Texas secure the border.” Abbott has also been in the news in recent weeks because Texas passed a bill that bans abortions after six weeks. Pro-abortion groups took the state to court over the law and attempted to get the courts to halt enforcement of the law while litigation is pending. The Supreme Court allowed the law to go into effect, a move that prompted Democrats in the House of Representatives to pass a bill to codify abortion rights on a federal level this week. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPAbbott also signed a new election law in Texas this month that Democrats argue is meant to suppress votes. Republicans, meanwhile, say it will make the state’s elections more secure. That law is already the subject of several lawsuits. Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report. 

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